Sunday, September 24, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: September 24

September 24, 1912 – Traveling at a speed of about 40 miles an hour down a steep grade, the bare truck of a freight car, near the front of the Plainview branch of the regular mixed Northwestern train, became defective and derailed the car. It carried with it five other box cars and two passenger coaches and tore up the rails for fully 600 feet.

The engine and two box cars just behind it remained on the track, but three of the cars turned completely over and the passenger coaches were thrown at right angles with the roadbed. One passenger, Henry Engl of Elgin, was injured, but will probably recover.

The accident took place three miles south of Plainview, about 2 p.m. today. The train was bound for Eyota, and had reached the grade and was making fast time, when it crossed a high bridge.

It had barely cleared the bridge when the truck on the second car behind the engine apparently tore loose and derailed the car and the others behind it. The escape of all but one of the 20 passengers is considered miraculous.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Wreck near Plainview. One Hurt When Mixed Train on Northwestern Jumps Track.”; September 25, 1912; p. 1.




http://www.lakesnwoods.com/Plainview.htm

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Saturday, September 23, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: September 23

September 23, 2014 – Money magazine revealed its list of the 50 best places to live in America, ranked by “great jobs, strong economies, affordable homes, excellent schools, and much more.” Minnesota’s Maple Grove was #2 on the list, followed by Egan at #11, and Woodbury at #12.

http://time.com/money/collection/best-places-to-live/?xid=newsletter-brief




Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain September 23, 2017,
as long as acknowledgement included.





http://www.gordysautoglass.com/eagan-mn-auto-residential-glass-specialists



Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain September 23, 2017,
as long as acknowledgement included.

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                        


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Friday, September 22, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: September 22

September 22, 1911 – The body of J. Kahler, aged 47, who came to Calumet, Minn., from New Auburn, Minn., was found lying on the tracks today under circumstances leading to the belief he was slugged, robbed and the body laid on the track to make it appear he had been killed by the cars.

The engineer of a Missabe ore train saw the body lying on the track while the train was going at a rapid rate and before he could check the train several cars passed over the body, mutilating it.

The Duluth Herald; “Slugged and Robbed, Then Laid on Track is Theory in Calumet Tragedy.”; September 23, 1911; p. 6.


http://www.lakesnwoods.com/images/Calume14.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Thursday, September 21, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: September 21

September 21, 1897 – The first child ever born in the Minnesota penitentiary at Stillwater during the entire history of that institution was born at 6 a.m. today. The mother was Nellie Frayer, who is serving a life sentence for the murder of the eight-year-old son of David Maxwell, at Moorhead.

Mrs. Frayer was committed to the prison March 10 of this year, but Maxwell, who was accused of complicity in the same crime, did not have his trial until last week. Mrs. Frayer was taken to Moorhead to testify in his trial, and had the unfortunate little girl been born only a few hours earlier, she would at least have escaped the disgrace of being born within the walls of a prison, for it was only yesterday the mother returned from her trip.

The infant weighed eight pounds at birth and appears healthy and strong, and there is every reason to believe she will live. Mrs. Frayer has four other children who are now being cared for at Moorhead. She ascribes the paternity of this one to Maxwell. Warden Wolfer says that as soon as the child is old enough to be taken from its mother she will probably be placed in some charitable institution.

Mrs. Frayer had admitted during her murder trial that David Maxwell had asked her to help him kill his son Willie. She had been living with him as his housekeeper, but obviously with the birth of her daughter, their relationship was more than that. Frayer says she tied the boy up in the barn, then set the building on fire, doing away with both the barn and the boy.
__________________

The Frayer child was eventually sent to the state school at Owatonna. Nellie Frayer died Aug. 4, 1905 of consumption (TB). Her remains were interred in the state’s lots in Fairview cemetery.
__________________

The Minneapolis Tribune; “Child Born in Prison.”; Sept. 22, 1897; p. 3.

Two Harbors Iron News; “Prison Born”; Oct. 1, 1897; p. 2.

Stillwater Messenger; Aug. 12, 1905; p. 4.

The Minneapolis Journal; “Daughter is Born to Mrs. Brennan. Baby Inmate of the State Prison at Stillwater. Mother is Serving Life Sentence for Murder of three Children in Minneapolis Last Fall—James Brennan, Father of Child, will Pay Mother-in-Law to Care for It.”; July 26, 1906; p. 6.




Old Stillwater Prison

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/61/State_prison_at_Stillwater%2C_by_James_Sinclair.png

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Wednesday, September 20, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: September 20

September 20, 1858 – “First public school opened in St. Cloud. [The schoolhouse] was built in “Lower Town” (located where St. Cloud State University is today). It was built by private donations and named the Everett school in honor of Edward Everett of Massachusetts.

Everett was so honored to have the school named after him that he arranged for $200 worth of books to be sent to St. Cloud and to be used as a library for the school. These 130 volumes arrived in the city on February 12th, 1858. This was the first library in the city of St. Cloud.”

http://wjon.com/st-clouds-first-public-school-opened-on-this-date-in-central-minnesota-history/




Edward Everett
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Edward_Everett_daguerreotype.png

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Tuesday, September 19, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: September 19

September 19, 2013 – Nineteen-year-old Hopkins, Minn., Dairy Queen Manager Joey Prusak received a phone call today from billionaire Warren Buffet in response to Prusak’s actions the previous week. On Sept. 10, Prusak saw a regular customer drop a $20 bill and a woman standing near him pick it up and slip it in her purse. When the woman got up to the counter to place her order, Prusak refused to serve her unless she returned the money. The woman became irate, claiming the bill was hers, and stomped out of the store. Prusak then “gave the visually impaired customer who hadn't realized he'd dropped the money $20 out of his own pocket.”

"I was just doing what I thought was right," Prusak said. "I did it without even really thinking about it. ... Ninety-nine out of 100 people would've done the same thing as me."

Buffet, whose company owns Dairy Queen, called to thank Prusak for “being a role model for all the other employees and people in general.”

“Another customer saw the incident and sent an email to Dairy Queen. The email was forwarded to store owner Dave Pettit, who posted it at the store. Another employee took a picture, which has been circulating online.

Dean Peters, a spokesman for International Dairy Queen, said the company is figuring out how to reward Prusak.”

http://www.startribune.com/local/224443451.html



Dairy Queen Manager Joey Prusak

http://gawker.com/this-dairy-queen-employees-heartwarming-act-of-kindnes-1349065894

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Monday, September 18, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: September 18

September 18, 2008 – “In Minnesota the new Interstate 35W bridge opened. The old span over the Mississippi River had collapsed on August 1, 2007. The new St. Anthony Falls Bridge was embedded with an early warning system consisting of hundreds of sensors.”

http://timelines.ws/states/MINNESOTA.HTML




Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain Sept. 18, 2017, 
as long as acknowledgement included.  

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Sunday, September 17, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: September 17

September 17, 1911 – According to today’s issue of The Minneapolis Morning Tribune, the honor of being the first woman ever to enter the school of instruction for aviators conducted by the Wright brothers at their training camp in Dayton, Ohio, belongs to a Minneapolis woman, Mrs. Emma Dewella McKenzie.





Formerly employed at the Tri-State Automobile Company, McKenzie has left for Dayton where she will be taught to operate a flying machine. She will work under contract with the Wright brothers in exhibitions as soon as she has secured her pilot’s license from the Aero Club of America.

McKenzie will not fly under her own name, but has adopted that of Ethel McNorton. She watched the Wright aviators, Howard Gill and Frank Coffyn, perform at the state fair and fairly burned up the telegraph wires between Minneapolis and Dayton until she secured the consent of the Wright Company to allow her to attend their camp at Dayton.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Minneapolis Woman to Fly Soon as She Gets License”; Sept. 17, 1911; p. 13.
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Saturday, September 16, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: September 16

September 16, 1904 – For the fourth time in a decade the plant of the St. Paul Sash and Door Company, Rice and Tilton Streets, St. Paul, was destroyed by fire this afternoon. The loss is estimated at $123,000, and the insurance amounts to $7,500.

The fire started shortly after 4 p.m. in the basement under the boiler-room. Seventy-five men were at work in the factory when the building began to fill with smoke.  So rapidly did the flames spread that the men on the third floor could not get out at the usual exits, but were driven to the roof of a shed, from which they reached the ground by ladders.

Julius Bjornstad, president of the company, turned in the alarm. It was more than an hour before the fire department began getting control of the fire.

The building was a three-story brick structure and was well filled with machinery and valuable hardwood. Most of the stock was completely destroyed.

Bjornstad says that the work of reconstruction will begin immediately.

The Minneapolis Journal; “Fire Loss of $123,000. St. Paul Sash and Door Company Burned Out for Fourth Time in Ten Years.”; Sept. 17, 1904; p. 6.



Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain 9/16/2017,
as long as acknowledgement included.
 

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.



Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Friday, September 15, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: September 15

September 15, 1901 – Running 40 miles an hour, today, with a dead engineer at the throttle, freight train No. 69, westbound on the Milwaukee Road, crashed into the third section of eastbound train No. 66 at Eggleston, 12 miles from Red Wing.

Milwaukee Rode Logo1

Engineer Saxe of Minneapolis and Fireman Koethe of La Crosse, both on No. 69, were killed outright.

On train No. 66, Engineer W. A. Percy of Minneapolis had a shoulder dislocated, Brakeman Colby of Minneapolis was thrown a long distance into Vermillion slough and so seriously injured that he may die, and Brakeman H. C. Arne was hurt. He is expected to recover.

At the coroner’s inquest today, Conductor J. D. Trusome of Minneapolis, who was in charge of no. 69, said he received orders at Red Wing to meet No. 66 at Eggleston and No. 70 at East Hastings. He showed the orders to Saxe, who read them aloud and said he understood them.



Eggleston Train Depot2

When nearing Eggleston, the conductor noticed that the train was running faster than it should and he and his head brakeman applied the brakes.
A moment later the crash came. Both engines were demolished and 13 cars ditched. The third car on No. 69 was an empty box car, which jumped clear over the cars ahead of it and the two engines and rolled into the ditch 20 feet below.

Engineer Saxe and his fireman were found under the wreck; the engineer was cut into fragments.

This was fireman Koethe’s first trip over this division. He was 20 years old and had been employed on construction work on another part of the road.

Engineer Percy of train No. 66, eastbound, waited on the main track according to orders. He saw No. 69 come tearing down upon him and, hoping to avert an accident, backed up his train. However, he was too late; the westbound train crashed into him.

How he escaped, he doesn’t know, as he did not regain consciousness until physicians had worked over him for three hours. His right shoulder was dislocated. Brakeman Colby was thrown into Vermillion slough and may be fatally hurt.

The general opinion is that Engineer Saxe died of failure after leaving Red Wing. He did not blow the whistle nor shut off the steam when approaching Eggleston and railroad men are confident that he was dead before the collision. His fireman, having never been over the line, could not be expected to notice the engineer’s failure to whistle or shut off steam when approaching the station.

Traffic was blockaded for hours and several trains were sent over Burlington tracks.

The Minneapolis Journal; “Wreck at Red Wing. Engineer E. W. Saxe Was Dead at the Throttle. Accident of the Milwaukee. Freight No. 69 Crashes Into the Third Section of the Eastbound Train.”; Sept. 16, 1901; p. 2.

1http://trainweb.org/milwaukeemyths/images/milwaukee-road-logo.gif

2http://www.west2k.com/mnpix/eggleston.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.



Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Thursday, September 14, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: September 14

September 14, 1910 – Ulysses S. Grant, son of President Grant, is a guest at the home of Lieutenant Ulysses S. Macy, navy recruiting officer in Minneapolis. Mr. Grant is Mrs. (Miriam) Macy’s father and his visit is brought about by his desire to see his new baby grandson, Grant, for the first time. Mr. Grant is an attorney in San Diego, Cal.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune
; “Son of U. S. Grant in City.”; Sept. 14, 1910; p. 7.
__________________________

Yes, I checked; Mrs. Macy married a man who had the same name and middle initial as her father and grandfather.





Ulysses S. Grant, Jr.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulysses_S._Grant_Jr.#/media/File:Ulysses_S_Grant_Jr.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Wednesday, September 13, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: September 13

September 13, 1904 – A week-old baby boy was abandoned in Donaldson’s Glass Block department store downtown Minneapolis this afternoon. The police are making efforts to find the woman who left it.

A stylishly dressed woman went into the store with a large bundle. After making a few small purchases she left the bundle on one of the counters. Soon afterward a clerk noticed that the bundle was very much alive, and on opening it she found the baby. It was at once taken to the Central police station and later to the Bethany Home.

The clerks say they can identify the woman and she will be found and held to account.

The Minneapolis Journal; “Babe Deserted in Store. Bundle Left on Counter Found to Hold Infant.”: Sept. 14, 1904; p. 7.

The Saint Paul Globe; “Big Detective Acts As A Nurse. Tries to Take Care of an Infant Which Was Deserted by its Parents,”; Sept. 14, 1904; p. 6.




Donaldson's Glass Block

http://www.lakesnwoods.com/images/Minnea17.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Tuesday, September 12, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: September 12

September 12, 1903 – Immigrant Commissioner Sargent today ordered the deportation of Jorginne Jakobsen and her child to her home in Norway on the ground that she was likely to become a public charge.

Mrs. Jakobsen was destined for Granite Falls, Minn., where she had friends, who had sent her money to come from Christiana, but when she arrived at New York and was questioned by immigration officers she stated that she was going to Minnesota to work, but had nothing but her railway ticket.

Minnesota Representative Volstad asked the Department of Commerce to permit the woman to enter this country, but he was informed today that it would be impossible under the law.

The Minneapolis Journal; “A Mother and Child Deported. Norwegian Woman Was Bound for Minnesota, but the Authorities Turned Her Back.”; Sept. 12, 1903; p. 1.


http://www.granitefallshealthcare.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Granite-Falls-Sign-Straight.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Monday, September 11, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: September 11

September 11, 1999 – Minnesota Twin Eric Milton pitched a no-hitter against the Anaheim Angels on this date.

http://sabr.org/bioproj/park/b6255f4d



Eric Milton
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/76/92/33/7692334ac5a1f4328834eec7334b4fbf.jpg


               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com



Sunday, September 10, 2017

On This date in Minnesota History: September 10

September 10, 1820 – The cornerstone for Fort Snelling, originally called Fort St. Anthony, was laid on this date.

Upham, Warren; Minnesota Geographic Names, Their Origin and Historic Significance; Minnesota Historical Society (St. Paul, Minn., 1969); p. 288.




http://www3.iath.virginia.edu/minnesota/snelling.html
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com