Sunday, December 31, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 31

December 31, 1979 - Colonial Hall and Masonic Lodge No. 30 consists of two historic buildings owned by Anoka (Minn.) Lodge No 30 AF & AM, which was chartered on October 25, 1859. Colonial Hall is a two-story wooden building built in 1904 for Drs. Alanson and Flora Aldrich. Its architect was Frederick Marsh who lived in Champlin. It was purchased by Anoka Lodge in 1921.

In 1922, construction began on the present two story redbrick Masonic temple, which is located behind but to the north of the Colonial Hall. Designed by Frederick Marsh, it was completed and occupied in 1923. Colonial Hall and Masonic Lodge No. 30 were added to the National Register of Historic Places on this date. Anoka Lodge No. 30 still meets in the lodge hall. Colonial Hall is now occupied by a tenant, the Anoka Artique.

http://nrhp.mnhs.org/NRDetails.cfm?NPSNum=79001182

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonial_Hall_and_Masonic_Lodge_No._30






 Colonial Hall and Masonic Lodge No. 30, Anoka, Minn.
Photos taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain Dec. 31, 2017, 
as long as acknowledgement included.  

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


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Saturday, December 30, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 30

December 30, 1910 – If Henri Mosse, globe trotter, native of France, succeeds in getting back to Paris before 10 a.m., June 10, 1912; he will win 50,000 francs ($10,000) as a prize offered by Henri Rochefort, editor of La Patrie.

Mosse arrived in Minneapolis today, confident he is on schedule. Using his own two legs as his sole means of transportation, the little Frenchman is contented with his lot and believes that globe-trotting is the best exercise. Mosse started out from Lyons, France, June 10, 1908. Since then he has visited every nation on the globe.




The globe trotter makes his living giving lectures and exhibition walking stunts.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Globe Trotter Visits City. Henri Mosse, Walking Around the World, Must Arrive in France June 10, 1912, to win Prize.”; Dec. 31, 1910; p. 5.
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


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Friday, December 29, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 29

December 29, 1909 – Fire broke out in the McAlpine Building in Grand Rapids, Minn., this morning, completely gutting the structure occupied by M. McAlpine as a saloon, John Billodeau as a restaurant with rooms upstairs and H. W. Willing as a confectionery. The fire started in the restaurant from the explosion of gasoline in a coffee percolator.

The firemen had difficulty in getting water as the hydrants and hose were frozen, and the fire got a good start before the firemen could get water to it.

The fire department struggled for five hours with hose, ladders and hooks, trying to confine the fire to the one building, which was a complete loss.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Grand Rapids Has $4,000 Fire. Several Firms Lose When One Building is Destroyed.”; Dec. 30, 1909; p. 11.



https://www.mesabitrail.com/_site_components/img/user/enlarged/communitiesgrand-rapids0.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Thursday, December 28, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 28

December 28, 2012 – Duluth’s Lakeview Christian Academy senior guard Anders Broman became Minnesota’s all-time leading boys basketball scorer. Broman scored 42 points in the Lions’ 100-87 victory in the opening round of the Hibbing Holiday Tournament before a near-sellout crowd at Lincoln Elementary School, giving him 4,122 career points to surpass the 4,086 credited to Minnesota Transitions’ Kevin Noreen.

http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/event/article/id/254028/


Anders Broman
https://cdn3.sportngin.com/attachments/text_block/2094/7611/2prep0301_medium.jpg


               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


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Wednesday, December 27, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 27

December 27, 1909 – A racial controversy with the attack directed against a minister of the gospel is gripping the attention of the residents in a section of the Lake Harriet district in much the same way that a similar affair affected residents in Prospect Park a short time ago.

The minister is Rev. W. S. Malone of a Methodist Episcopal church at 107 Washington Ave. N., who has an office at 112 Washington Ave. N. where he is said to publish a religious paper. The trouble has arisen over his buying a residence in the district and announcing an intention to occupy it as a home.



Washington Ave. North1

An indignation meeting was held this evening at the home of Oscar V. Carlson, Zenith Ave. S., almost directly across the street from property that the Negro minister had purchased.

Over 100 of the residents of the neighborhood, many of them owners of property and some coming from blocks away, gathered at the meeting place in a surprisingly short time after word was sent out that there was to be concerted action against the Negro’s settling in the neighborhood.

Through advice from another Negro, who asserted that the Rev. Malone had moved into other cities to secure exorbitant sums for property he had bought in highly respectable neighborhoods, Carlson secured Attorney Morris, a colored attorney, who has offices in the Metropolitan building, to advise the other residents how to best get rid of the man of the lawyer’s own race. Morris was a conspicuous figure at the indignation meeting.


Lake Harriet Parkway1

Morris declared that if the property owners would restrain their feelings in the matter, he was confident he could take their case and persuade Rev. Malone not to move into his new house. He said further that he was sure that if Malone did take possession of the property before this could be accomplished, he could persuade him to leave without trouble.

The keys have already been delivered to Rev. Malone and yesterday he made a visit to his prospective home. He was met by several of the men living near the house and informed that members of his race were not wanted. He said he was surprised as he had been given to understand that Negroes were welcomed by the other residents.

It is understood that the minister intends to move his household goods into his new home tomorrow morning.

According to the universal expression of those at Carson’s home, this present controversy and the problem they now find before them of getting rid of the Negro is the outcome of a number of troubles that have risen in the neighborhood during several weeks; specifically revenge. Their story is as follows:

Mrs. Marie A Canfield, who formerly occupied the house, sold it to the minister. Several weeks ago she brought suit against a local furniture concern for damages on account of a defective gas stove. She maintained that the stove leaked gas and that she would have been asphyxiated but or a pet cat’s stroking her face and waking her from her stupor.

During the trial a large number of her neighbors were subpoenaed to appear as witnesses. In all cases they testified that Mrs. Canfield was a habitual user of opiates.

A short time later she advertised her property for sale, to Negroes only. The purchase of the house by the minister and plans to make his home in the neighborhood resulted.

Unlike the Prospect Park situation, there have not yet been any proposals for the residents to pool their money to buy out the Negro. It was said this evening that this would not be done, but that the colored man would not be tolerated, nevertheless.

It was stated that the property was probably worth about $1,600 and that the Rev. Malone says he paid $2,600 for it. It was also stated by one that the minister has said he would sell the house and lot for $2,900.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Negro Minister Is Under Exclusion Ban. Lake Harriet Now Has a Problem Like That in Prospect Park. Rev. W. S. Malone Starts Racial Conflicts by Securing Home There. Colored Lawyer Called In to Advise Protestants at Meeting.”; Dec. 28, 1909; p. 1.

1Photos taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain Dec. 28, 2016, as long as acknowledgement included.
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


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Tuesday, December 26, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 26

December 26, 1917 – Red Cross knitting to occupy patients at the St. Peter State Hospital for the insane has changed one ward from the noisiest to the quietest in the institution, Miss M. J. Carey, in charge of Red Cross activities at the state institutions, reported today to the State Board of Control. About 25 patients at the St. Peter Hospital have knitted 191 sweaters for the soldiers and the local Red Cross chapter doesn’t want to lose their help through the organization of a separate chapter there.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Noisiest Insane Patients Become Quietest After Knitting for Red Cross”; Dec. 27, 1917; p. 5.


St. Peter State Hospital

http://www3.gendisasters.com/files/files/newphotos2/st._peter,_minn_insane_asylum_fire.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


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Monday, December 25, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 25

December 25, 1964 - Fred Hargesheimer, Rochester, Minn., native, appeared on the nationally televised “Jack Paar Show”. He recounted his World War II story of being shot down over New Guinea and saved by friendly natives.

http://www.ci.white-bear-township.mn.us/vertical/sites/%7B801D228F-081F-4123-B371-0DC5894FC6D6%7D/uploads/%7BC459BB85-FE9B-48EF-BD64-4A2FA70A3744%7D.PDF




Fred Hargesheimer

https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Fred_Hargesheimer

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Sunday, December 24, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 24

December 24, 1906 – Elias Jobes, a well-known farmer living near Maple Grove, a small town three miles west of Osseo, was shot and killed this afternoon by his brother-in-law, Clyde King, after the two had quarreled.

*

Jobes died instantly in the sight of his wife. King was immediately captured by William Leisen, a neighbor, and taken to Osseo, where he was placed to jail. Later he was brought to Minneapolis.

The murder has stirred Osseo and Maple Grove and a rigid investigation is promised by those interested.

King has been living at the Jobes’ house for five weeks. During that time, they often quarreled, but never, so far as known, did King ever attempt violence.


Today the two went to Osseo to buy Christmas presents. While there they made the rounds of the saloons, drinking freely. When they finally got ready to go home they bought a large bottle of whiskey. At that time there was no sign of trouble. Both seemed to be on the best of terms.

What happened on the way home or what was said is not known. The men were alone, and King, who is now in jail, refuses to talk, except to say he acted in self-defense.

When the men reached their home they were in an ugly mood. They went immediately into the house, where they met Mrs. Jobes and her three children. Jobes attempted to order King around and the two again wrangled.

Finally Jobes attacked King. The latter defended himself as best he could with his fists, but being weaker than his opponent, was gradually being forced to the floor. Seeing that he was mastered and in grave danger of receiving a severe beating, King seized a double barreled shotgun and, pointing it at Jobes, fired both barrels.

The charges entered the latter’s breast and he fell to the floor, dead. Mrs. Jobes and her children, who saw the tragedy, quickly went to the fallen man’s assistance. They lifted him up, hoping to find him only slightly injured. However, they found he was dead, and ran outside to get help. King, in the meantime, stood beside the dead body as if stunned. He did not say a word to his sister or the children. Apparently he was bewildered over the tragic turn of events.

Neighbor William Leisen, a farmer living across the road, heard the shots and ran to the house. He went inside and seeing King standing there, made him a prisoner. King did not resist and quietly submitted to being loaded into a wagon and taken to Osseo.

**


Marshal Meachan of that place met Leisen and his prisoner some distance out in the country and took the latter to the village jail, where he was held.

Coroner Kistler of Minneapolis went out to view the remains of the dead man. He will swear in a jury room and hold an inquest. Assistant County Attorney Bernhagen was with him. He questioned the prisoner carefully and also gathered facts from Mrs. Jobes and her children.

King is sullen, and says he acted in self-defense.

The men had not been on good terms for some time and neighbors had constantly expected trouble between them. King came to Hennepin County five weeks ago from Tower City, ND, to live with Jobes. He is 25 years old and single.

Mrs. Jobes is on the verge of nervous prostration as the result of the tragedy and is under a physician’s care. The county officials will question her closely and she will probably be the chief witness against her brother when he is taken into court for trial.

King was brought to Minneapolis this evening by Coroner Kistler and Deputy Prosecutor Bernhagen and will be kept here for safety.

The Minneapolis Tribune; “Shoots Brother-In-Law; Is Captured; Confesses. Clyde King Kills Elias Jobes Near Osseo, Minn., in the Presence of His Victim’s Wife and Children—Assailant Admonished for Drinking So Much—He Took Offense At Advice and Surrendered to Wild Desire to Kill Relative.”; December 25, 1906; p. 1.
____________________________

On Feb. 13, 1907, King was found guilty of murder in the second degree, the jury returning a verdict after an all-night session.

King was found to be sane at the time of the murder, and sentenced to hard labor for the rest of his life at the state prison in Stillwater.

The Bemidji Daily Pioneer; “Killed His Brother-In-Law. Clyde King Convicted of Murder at Minneapolis.”; February 13, 1907; p. 4.

The Minneapolis Tribune; “Not Insane, So Goes to the State Prison”; Feb. 22, 1907; p. 7.

*Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain Dec. 24, 2017, as long as acknowledgement included. 

**http://maplegrovemag.com/sites/lakeminnetonkamag.com/files/styles/629w-scale/public/field/image/MPG5158OsseoWaterTower_MM_15.jpg?itok=DiSF9mXP
     
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Saturday, December 23, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 23

December 23, 1908 – Many families in Minneapolis will be without their usual amount of milk tomorrow as the result of a crusade headed by Milk Inspector W. D. McCall this afternoon when 630 gallons of milk consigned to the Minneapolis Milk Company by the Northfield Creamery Company were dumped into the sewer.

The action was taken because the Northfield Creamery Company has failed to have its herds of cows inspected as required by state law. The Minneapolis Milk Company, wishing to have pure milk, conferred with Health Commissioner P. M. Hall three weeks ago relative to the Northfield concern promised to take the matter up at the meeting of stockholders the first of the year.

Dr. Hall and Inspector McCall became impatient, however, and today when wagons of the Minneapolis Milk Company, loaded down with Northfield milk, were proceeding through the streets, Inspector McCall called a halt. This was at Third Ave. South and Second Street. Sixty-three cans, each holding 10 gallons of milk, were taken from the wagons and one by one opened and the contents poured into the sewer.


Milk Cans1

The operation took over an hour, during which time a crowd of a hundred or more persons watched the performance.

The Minneapolis Tribune; “Great Loads of Milk Poured Into Sewer. Milk Inspector McCall Destroys 630 Gallons of Lacteal Fluid. Failure of Company to Have Cows Inspected Cause of Action; Dec. 24, 1908; p. 7.

1http://dailyreporter.com/files/2009/10/creameries-0-102309.jpg
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Friday, December 22, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 22

December 22, 1910 – Calice Quesnel, 40 years old, and a resident of Hornet Township, Beltrami County, was examined in Probate Court this afternoon as to his sanity. He was found to be of unsound mind, and was taken to Fergus Falls this evening by Deputy Sheriff Rutledge.

Quesnel is of Canadian birth and has been a resident of Beltrami County for more than 26 years. He is married and the father of six children.

This is the second time that Quesnel has been found to be mentally ill. He was committed to the Fergus Falls asylum three years ago last June, released on parole the following August and discharged as being in sound health in March 1908.

Friends of the unfortunate man are of the opinion that he has never been well since his discharge several years ago, and say that he has repeatedly shown spells of insanity.

During these spells he has on several occasions, it is said, made many attacks upon the life of his wife with a razor, his favorite weapon.

Upon regaining his senses he claims he has had a dream. One of his most repeated habits is to wake up during the night and swear that the house is full of men, and that they are after him.

Quesnel at times is unable to recognize his own family.

The Bemidji Daily Pioneer; “Goes Insane for the Second Time. Calice Quesnel Adjudged Insane Yesterday in Probate Court by Judge Clark. Committed to Asylum Twice. Subject to Spells Which He Regards as Dreams—Pioneer Belrami County Man.”; December 23, 1910, p. 1.


Fergus Falls Hospital in 1915

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Fergus_Falls_Hospital_1915.jpg


               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Thursday, December 21, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 21

December 21, 1903 – After lingering over a month in the shadow of death, Minier Simard, the carpenter who was injured Nov. 14 while at work on the West Publishing Company’s new addition downtown St. Paul, is now so far recovered as to be able to walk about. Today he was taken from the city hospital to the home of a brother after being confined to bed five weeks.


West Publishing Company 18911

When Simard was struck down by a heavy timber that he was carrying with three fellow workmen, his skull was fractured at the base of the brain and so badly was he injured that it was at first thought he had been killed outright. A call was sent for Coroner Miller, but Dr. Moore, police surgeon, who arrived in response to a summons, discovered that the man was alive. Blood flowed from Simard’s ears, mouth and nose, and it seemed as though death was imminent. He was hurried to the hospital, where he was attended by the house physicians and Dr. A. W. Whitney. While suffering from the fractured skull, his condition was complicated by the house nephritis that developed as a result of the shock of the injury, and for weeks he seemed close to death.

With remarkable vitality, however, he rallied and gradually recovered strength and consciousness. He still suffers slight paralysis, however. His sense of smell is somewhat impaired and one eyelid is paralyzed.

To overcome the defect of the eyelid that he is unable to open, Simard has invented a contrivance by which he holds the lid up, giving him use of his vision. The invention consists of a combination of rubber straps with a small clamp to lift and hold up the eyelid.

Dr. Whitney says that Simard will be able to go back to work as soon as he recovers his strength. Is recovery is regarded as remarkable.

The St. Paul Globe; “He Leaves Hospital. Minier Simard’s Recovery Surprises Physicians.”; Dec. 22, 1903; p. 2.

1https://img.apmcdn.org/c85d20f85101efe427a9ab4aeb63428b788a29b9/uncropped/b73c82-20150529-west01.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Wednesday, December 20, 2017

On this Date in Minnesota History: December 20

December 20, 1909 - Laurits S. Swenson, vice president and manager of the Union State Bank of Minneapolis, was today appointed minister from the United States to Switzerland by President Taft.



Laurits S. Swenson1

It has been known for some time that the president was considering the Minneapolis man for an important post but his appointment today was nevertheless somewhat expected.

Swenson is well known throughout the state and his service as minister to Denmark from 1897 to 1905 has given him an excellent training for his new post. While in Denmark he was closely identified with the treaty between that country and the United States relating to the Danish West Indies and for the last three years at Copenhagen was dean of the diplomatic corps.

The new minister is a Minnesota boy, having been born and reared in Nicollet County, a few miles west of St. Peter. He is 44 years old. After returning from Denmark he helped to organize the Union State Bank and has devoted his time to that institution ever since.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Lauritz S. Swenson, Named by President as Country’s New Minister to Switzerland”; Dec. 21, 1909; p. 8.

1https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laurits_S._Swenson#/media/File:Laurits_S._Swenson.jpg
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Tuesday, December 19, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 19

December 19, 1919 – The manufacture of intoxicating liquor for the manufacturer’s own use and transportation of it, except for medicinal and other expressly permitted purposes, are unlawful in Minnesota, the state supreme court held in decisions filed today sustaining the validity of the so-called prohibition enforcement law enacted by the 1919 legislature. This decision is a blow to “home stills.”


Example of a home still1 

The legislature may prohibit traffic in near intoxicants, the court rules.

The decisions affirm orders of the Hennepin County District Court overruling demurrers to indictments against Eugene A. Hosmer and Andrew Brothers, both of Minneapolis. Hosmer was charged with manufacturing one quart of beer to be used as a beverage and containing one-half of one percent alcohol. The indictment against Brothers accused him of unlawfully transporting one gallon of intoxicating liquor.

“The ultimate purpose of prohibition is to prevent the excessive use of intoxicating liquors,” says the opinion in the Hosmer appeal. “To accomplish that purpose and to prevent evasions, the legislature may prohibit the traffic, sale, transportation, possession and manufacture, even for the use of the manufacturer.”

In the Brothers case, it is held among other things, that “to make the enforcement of prohibition effective the legislature may prohibit traffic in beverages near to intoxicating.

“The fact that the legislature declares such beverages intoxicating does not invalidate such prohibition. It is within the power of the legislature to prohibit the manufacture, transportation and sale of liquor containing one-half percent of alcohol.”

Both opinions, written by Judge Oscar Hallam, are unanimous.



Judge Oscar Hallam2 

 Hosmer contended that he made the liquor in good faith as a tonic for his aged father. Brothers was charged with transporting intoxicating liquor July 29 in Minneapolis.

Both indictments by the Hennepin County grand jury were returned under Chapter 455 of the Minnesota laws of 1919. The trial court overruled the demurrer to the indictment and certified ten questions on each to the supreme court.

Decisions today uphold at every point of attack the constitutionality and validity of the new law.

Going further, the court holds that it is within the power of the legislature to prohibit the manufacture, transportation and sale of liquor containing one-half percent of alcohol, and not actually intoxicating and that the fact that the legislature declares such beverages intoxicating does not invalidate such prohibition. Thus in the Hosmer case, even home manufacture of near intoxicants is held to violate the law, and the decision, it is said, may be taken as the Swan Song of the home still.

Holding that provisions making places where liquor is manufactured and sold nuisances, are germane to the general subject, the court overrules a contention that the enforcement law contains more than one subject and is invalid.

The law is not unconstitutional as a delegation of legislative power to congress, the opinion states.

“A state statute absolutely prohibiting within the limits of the state the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors,” says the opinion in the Hosmer case, “is a warranted exercise of police power. It is not in contravention of our state constitution or of the constitution of the United States.”

The Daily People’s Press; “State Supreme Court Upholds Prohibition. Minn. Decision Holds that Manufacture and Transportation Are Prohibited. Ruling Strikes At Home Stills. Court Unanimous in Opinion Upholding the Enforcement Law.”; Owatonna, Steele County, Minn.; Dec. 29, 1919; p. 1.

1https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e9/72/b4/e972b45aaa2e47347c3b1e1c39686645.jpg (home still)

2https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oscar_Hallam#/media/File:Oscar_Hallam_(Minnesota_Supreme_Court).gif
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If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including: census records, birth records, death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records. I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.




Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow. 



Website: TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at: pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com