Thursday, November 30, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 30

November 30, 1922 – James McKay, about 58 years old, well-known lumberjack and known by hundreds of settlers through Itasca County as “Porcupine Jimmie,” lost his life tonight in a fire that destroyed the Cyrl Hotel at Bena. Lloyd Kegley, another roomer at the hotel, was seriously burned about the hands, head and arms, was brought to Grand Rapids and is reported in serious condition at the local hospital. He will recover.

The fire, which started shortly after 9 p.m., is believed to have had its origin from a carelessly thrown cigarette butt. All of the persons in the building escaped with their lives with the exception of McKay.

The building was owned by Koors Brothers of Bemidji and occupied by L. J. Carpenter, who operated a pool room on the first floor and a rooming house upstairs. A small adjoining building, belonging to James Costello, was also consumed by the flames.

The Duluth Herald: “Bena Hotel Fire Takes One Life. ‘Porcupine Jimmie,’ Well-Known Itasca County Lumberjack, Victim.”; Dec. 1, 1922; p. 1.


http://www.minnesotabound.com/visit/Bena/Bena1.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Wednesday, November 29, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 29

November 29, 2012 – Responding to a welfare check request, Cold Spring police officer Tom Decker “was fatally shot after getting out of his squad car near”1 Winners Bar.  The man who lived above the bar, the man Decker was coming to check on, was arrested but later released after the Sterns County prosecutor said they didn’t have enough evidence to charge him.2

One month later a second suspect committed suicide as investigators attempted to question him during the follow up investigation. The gun used to murder Officer Decker was found on property the suspect had access to.”3

1
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/30/tom-decker-dead-cold-spring-minnesota_n_2218662.html

2Star Tribune; Minneapolis, Minn.; “Details of slaying scene emerge”; Dec. 7, 2012; pp B1 & B7.

3http://www.odmp.org/officer/21550-police-officer-tom-decker




Tom Decker
http://www.odmp.org/officer/21550-police-officer-tom-decker

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                        


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Tuesday, November 28, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 28

November 28, 1978The F.W. Cappelen Memorial Bridge, better known as the Franklin Ave. Bridge, was named to the National Register of Historic Places on this date. Completed in 1923, it carries Franklin Ave. over the Mississippi River in Minneapolis.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin_Avenue_Bridge








Photos taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain Nov. 19, 2013,
as long as acknowledgement included. 
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Monday, November 27, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 27

November 27, 1916 – After observations of the new outbreak of the foot and mouth disease at important livestock centers of the Middle West, officials of the South St. Paul Union Stock Yards Company this evening issued an embargo against livestock shipments from Illinois as a precautionary measure.

Dr. F. D. Ketchum, veterinarian in charge of the Federal office of the bureau of animal industry at South St. Paul, received no advice today as to how to handle the situation. It was pointed out that the embargo would affect the stocker and feeder trade, as the restriction concerns that class of stock largely.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “St. Paul Stock Yards Bar Illinois Cattle.”; Nov. 28, 1916; p. 1.

The Stockyards Exchange Building in South St. Paul was named to the National Register of Historical Places on March 7, 1979.Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain Nov. 27, 2017,
as long as acknowledgement included.


               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Sunday, November 26, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 26

November 26, 1904 – Orlin Kalderwit, alias Calderwood; John Kolb and Charles Hammond are held at the Minneapolis central police station on suspicion of being implicated in the murder of little Freddie King, who was killed at the time of the holdup at Mingo’s Saloon in Anoka County Tues. night.


Kolb, Kalderwit and Hammond1

The men were arrested at the Grand Central Hotel in Minneapolis shortly after 3 this morning by Detectives Crummy, Brown and Johnson, who, dressed as hobos, had been following them for several days ever since seven holdups in different parts of the city had taken place. The detectives watched the hotel from a building down the street all night. They had made arrangements with the night clerk to give a signal as soon as the men appeared, and about 3 a.m. they came to the hotel.

Four persons who were present at the time of the robbery saw the men this evening, and are positive in their identification, and three others at the central station tonight were almost convinced that the right men have been taken into custody.

At the station they were assigned separate cells and no person except Chief Conroy and the detectives were permitted to see them.

Kolb seemed to be on the point of breaking down, and it was the belief of the police it would not be a long time before he gave in and told the whole story.

A full-dress lineup was held tonight in the central police station cell room. The three men were attired in the clothing that had been found near the scene of the robbery and murder, and the men were forced to walk and talk and give the commands that the robbers used at the time of the holdup. The witnesses were brought in two or three at a time and given every opportunity to view the prisoners.

The identification of Kalderwit was most positive. He was dressed in the duck coat and sweater found near the scene and this clothing has been positively identified as belonging to him.

In the case of Hammond, the tallest of the three and the man who is said to have shot the little boy, the identification of a number of witnesses was equally positive. He wore the new blue overalls, a slouch hat and had a red handkerchief about his face.

Kolb wore a cap pulled down over his eyes and had a blue handkerchief over the lower part of his face. He was the most nervous of the trio, and is expected to be the one who will tell the story, if any of the men confess.

A revolver found on the Great Northern tracks Friday morning has been identified by William Welsman as one he sold to Kalderwit the Saturday night before the homicide.


When questioned as to their whereabouts on the night of the saloon murder, the men told the same story to police: they had “knocked about town” on the night of the murder and had returned to their rooms at the Grand Hotel about 1 a.m.

They asserted they had not been in the vicinity of the holdup at any time.

Orlin Kalderwit, the oldest of the trio, has a prison record. He was sentenced to the penitentiary from Minneapolis by Judge Simpson on the charge of robbing gas meters and served time. A year ago he was arrested in St. Paul in connection with the murder of a man at Brainerd, but was dismissed because of lack of evidence.

He has been under surveillance by the police on several occasions since his release from the penitentiary, but has not been convicted of any charge.

John Kolb and Charles Hammond claim to have come from La Crosse. Neither has done time, but they have been arrested on several occasions and at one time suspected of a saloon holdup. No serious charge has ever been made against them.

The trio seemed to have money shortly after some of the recent holdups, but never any large amount for a long period. It was this fact that directed the attention of the police to the men.

Kalderwit and Hammond are suspected of holding up a saloon in New Brighton two weeks ago and securing $110; the little revolver and masks found in their rooms today at their hotel correspond with the paraphernalia that played an important part in the new Brighton holdup.

2


The revolver found on the Great Northern tracks was identified by J. H. King as the one that was placed in his face just after his son was killed. Although excited, he was able to describe a peculiarity in the make of the barrel before the weapon was shown him by the chief of police.

G. E. Cummings, who was one of the victims of the holdup, is positive in his identification of the men. He happened to be in the central station when the men were being taken to the office to be questioned.

Kalderwit, he was positive, was the man who wore a blue handkerchief over his face, and he is said to have been the man who shot E. J. Mingo, the bartender.

Hammond, he says, wore a red handkerchief over the lower part of his face and did most of the shooting. It is Conner’s claim that Hammond was the man who killed little Freddie King.


Freddie King and his siblings3

Kolb had a sweater muffler pulled up over his face for a mask and stood near the door with revolver in hand. He did little shooting and appeared to be somewhat frightened. He helped search some of the men who were lined up.

Late tonight Detectives Crummy and Brown secured a new 38-calibur bulldog revolver from James Holden, a boarder at the Grand Central Hotel, who purchased it from Kolb Friday night for $2. He also secured a box of cartridges.

Three revolvers were used at the Columbia Heights robbery and the little boy was killed by a 38-caliber weapon; E. J. Mingo, the bartender, was shot by a bullet of similar caliber. The weapon Kalderwit purchased was of 32-caliber and there is a bullet hole made by this gun in the screen at the saloon.

Today Kalderwit told police that Kolb had a revolver and late this evening the police found the man who had purchased it from him after he had peddled it about the hotel.

The Anoka County grand jury does not meet until March and unless a special term of court is called, the men will have to wait until then for trial.

Saint Paul Globe; “Minneapolis Police Arrest Trio for Columbia Heights Murder. Detectives Run Down Ex-Convict and Two Companions and Prisoners Are identified as the Hold-up men by Several of their Victims—Stories Told by the Men Under Arrest Conflict.”; Nov. 27, 1904; pp. 13 & 24.

1Saint Paul Globe; Nov. 27, 1904; p. 13.

2Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain Nov. 26, 2017, as long as acknowledgement included.

3The Minneapolis Tribune; Nov. 24, 1904; p. 1.

Nine-year-old Freddie King was killed and bartender Edward J. Mingo shot in the head by masked men who held up a saloon in Columbia Heights; see Nov. 22, 2017 blog.

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Saturday, November 25, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 25

November 25–26, 1982 – A fire on Thanksgiving Day “destroyed an entire block of Downtown Minneapolis, including the 16-story headquarters of Northwestern National Bank (now Wells Fargo) and the vacant, partially demolished location formerly occupied by Donaldson's department store.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minneapolis_Thanksgiving_Day_fire




http://www.austech.info/showthread.php/92803-Through-the-years-1982

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Friday, November 24, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 24

November 24, 1916 – The St. Louis County grand jury today returned indictments naming Victor Power, mayor of Hibbing; D. D. McEachin, former village treasurer W. J. Ryder, Rupert Swinnerton, B. J. Burrows and H. P. Curran, members of the Hibbing village council, and Albert Dixon and Jacob Messier, for alleged malfeasance in office and alleged misappropriation of public moneys.

C. M. Atkinson and R. W. Hitchcock, newspaper publishers, were also named for alleged complicity in obtaining public moneys fraudulently.

The men were arraigned before Judge W. A. Cant of the St. Louis county district court. Pleas will be made at Hibbing before Judge Hughes. Bail of $500 in each case was fixed.

John Mulvahill and Sam Sanderson, who also were indicted, did not appear in court.

The indicted men were represented by Attorney H. B. Fryberger, who raised an objection to the arraigning of the men in Duluth. The objection was overruled, but a request to allow the men to make their pleas at Hibbing was allowed.

No formal arrests were made by the sheriff, the men being called by telephone and told to appear before the court.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Mayor and Other Hibbing Officials Are Arraigned. Indictments Charge Misuse of Village Funds—No Formal Arrests.”; Nov.25, 1916; p. 1.




Victor Power, Mayor of Hibbing
http://hibbing.yolasite.com/resources/181438_173970146065939_100003588642413_236792_778260048_n.jpeg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Thursday, November 23, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 23

November 23, 1901 – The Minneapolis & St. Louis and the Omaha roads brought into Minneapolis today about 1,200 farmers, who were taken out to St. Louis Park and entertained by the Minnesota Sugar Company. They were shown through the plant by the officials and employees of the company and saw how the beet was converted into sugar, from the unloading of the cars until it was ready for use on the table. Many returned home this evening, but a number will remain in the cities for several days.

The Saint Paul Globe; “Saw Sugar Manufactured. Twelve Hundred Farmers Visit Beet Park Sugar Plant.”; Nov. 24, 1901; p. 8.




Minnesota Sugar Company, St. Louis Park, MN

http://slphistory.org/sugarbeet/

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                        


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


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Wednesday, November 22, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 22

November 22, 1904 – Nine-year-old Freddie King was killed and Edward J. Mingo probably fatally shot by masked men who held up the saloon at Columbia Heights, just outside the limits of Minneapolis and in Anoka County, this evening.

The incident occurred about 9 p.m. and at midnight the body of the little boy lay on a table in the saloon awaiting the arrival of the Anoka County coroner.

The murder was a most cold-blooded one. Three men and one woman were involved, and the prospects of their arrest are believed to be excellent.

This evening there was a turkey raffle at Edward Mingo’s saloon, in Anoka County, just across the line from Hennepin County.



The Village of Columbia Heights was formed on March 14, 1898 when it separated from Fridley Township. With 1696 acres, 100 citizens, and 20 houses, paths became roads, traffic patterns emerged, and a city began. The city name was selected by contest.1


The raffle was managed by M. E. Hickman and Henry Phol, a former Minneapolis policeman and at one time the proprietor of the saloon.

Shortly before 9 p.m. three masked men entered the place and began shooting. The first shot was directed at Edward J. Mingo, the bartender, who was behind the counter, and he received a shot in the left side of the face. The bullet passed through his mouth and lodged in the vicinity of the base of his brain.

Then the robbers opened fire on Hickman, who was behind several crates of turkeys and who was in charge of the raffle.

Little Freddie King stood in front of the crate, watching the manipulations of the man with the wheels and the paddles. When he heard the shots Freddie turned around. As he did so, the robbers shot at Hickman, but aimed low and the bullet entered the body of the little child. With a wild cry, he started for the side door and fell to the walk as soon as he passed through.


Inside the Mingo Saloon
2

The robbers continued shooting and one shot passed near proprietor Edward Mingo, and as Frank Mingo, a relative of the manager, descended the stairs, he, too, was the target of the thugs. They fired at him but missed. Then the men in the saloon were lined up and searched by the outlaws, securing about $15 from the till; Charles Monroe added $2.50 and several others gave up smaller amounts.

The murderers then departed and entered two wagons, which had been held for them by a woman, who stood nearby.

As soon as the men in the saloon recovered from their fright, they made a search for the murderers, and in a short while, William Spain, one of the trustees of the village, returned with with a brown sweater and a red handkerchief, like those that one of the robbers wore, which was discovered near the scene of the shooting.

A little later a duck coat, similar to the one worn by one of the men, a blue handkerchief, a sweater, muffler and a cap covered with gray horse hairs were found near the Soo tracks just below the scene of the shooting.

From all reports the shooters had two wagons in waiting and started for the city, but changed their minds and made their way to the east for the purpose of taking the Soo freight train for the east.

Their tracks were followed for some distance, but they doubled on their trail. A number of Minneapolis policemen boarded the Soo train that passed Central Ave. about midnight for the purpose of making a thorough search of the train.

A crowd came and gaped at the bloody body of the child, and finally one of the newspaper men suggested to one of the employees of the house, that it might be a proper thing to cover the body with a sheet. This was done.

J. H. King, a painter and decorator, is the boy’s father. He did not want to attend the raffle tonight, but some of his friends insisted that he should and to accommodate them he went. Freddie, the oldest of four, insisted that he should accompany him, and against his will he consented to permit the little one to go. At the time of the shooting, Mr. King was standing at the side of the hall and the boy stood directly in the range of fire.


Freddie King with his siblings
3



The Saint Paul Globe; “Masked Robbers Shoot Up Saloon. Kill Boy and Seriously Wound Bartender. Three Men Armed With Guns Interrupt Turkey Raffle at Columbia Heights—Woman Outside Holds horses While Bandits Kill Little Freddie King and Hold Up Men in Place—Murderers Make Their Escape Before Village Is Aroused.”; Nov. 23, 1904; pp. 1 & 8.

1https://www.columbiaheightsmn.gov/community/history_of_columbia_heights/index.php

2The Minneapolis Tribune; Nov. 24, 1904; p. 2.

3The Minneapolis Tribune; Nov. 24, 1904; p. 1.

Three young men were arrested this morning on suspicion of being implicated in the murder of little Freddie King, the nine-year-old boy shot and killed at a turkey raffle in Mingo’s Saloon, Columbia Heights; see Nov. 26, 2017 blog


               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Tuesday, November 21, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 21

November 21, 1913 – Harry Mont, also known as Andrew Montfelt, a convict, jumped into the doorway of a boxcar while a train was moving out of the new Stillwater prison yard late today.

A guard gave the alarm and a wall sentinel joined in the chase with a repeating rifle. Outside the yard the convict jumped from the moving train and started through the marsh to the St. Croix River, a mile away.

He was in a boat when he was frightened into surrendering by shots from the guards.

Mont was sent to the reformatory at St. Cloud from Duluth, Aug. 10, 1910, for grand larceny, and was transferred to the state prison June 28, 1912, for incorrigibility. He is wanted as a deserter from the navy.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Convict Attempts to Escape. Harry Mont Gets as Far as Boat in River, Then Surrenders.”; Nov. 22, 1913; p. 2.





Photos taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain July 10, 2014,
as long as acknowledgement included.
 

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                        


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Monday, November 20, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 20

November 20, 1912 – The corner stone of the Grand Army of the Republic (G. A. R.) monument being built in Bemidji’s Greenwood Cemetery was laid this afternoon in front of fifty to sixty people. The stone was a cube of St. Cloud granite, of which the monument is being constructed; each dimension being six feet and weighing six tons. It was laid on a base of concrete and will be covered by a smaller stone above which the column will rise.

At the exercises were the members of the G. A. R., Women’s Relief Corps, city and county officials and members of the council. In the corner stone was placed a copper casket that will be sealed in the stone. The casket contains copies of the Pioneer and Sentinel, a Lincoln bronze medal, a G. A. R. badge and button made from a captured Confederate cannon, a small United States flag, a list of the members of both the men and women’s G. A. R. orders and the city and county officials.

In the casket was also placed a piece of pine stump that came from the prison at Andersonville, Ga. This prison was one of the worst in the south and at one time housed 30,000 men who were forced to depend on a filthy stream for drinking water. Thousands were dying daily when a spring appeared from underneath a pine stump and furnished enough pure water to supply the camp. L. G. Pendergast was given a piece of the pine stump and that is the piece placed in the monument.

In a brief speech, L. G. Pendergast outlined the movement that resulted in the monument, saying that the money was raised by the G. A. R., Women’s Relief Corps, Commercial Club, city of Bemidji, Beltrami County and school children of the county. He laid emphasis on the fact that the monument is being raised to all men and women who had a part in the war, whether they were in the service of their country on land or sea, whether officer or private. P. J. Russell lauded the G. A. R. and the work of the Grand Army during the war.

The monument will be dedicated next Memorial Day. It will be 24-feet high, is set on the basic block of six foot cube and will cost between $1,300 and $1,400 before finished. A tablet saying “In Memory of the Veterans of the Civil War—1912” is on the smaller stone. The monument is located in the southwest corner of the cemetery and can be plainly seen from the road.

Bemidji Pioneer Daily; “Corner Stone Laid Wednesday”; Nov. 21, 1912; p. 1.




http://rachaelhanel.me/2014/07/25/greenwood-cemetery-bemidji-minnesota/

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Sunday, November 19, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 19

November 19, 1902 – Mrs. Gertrude Young passed away today in Minneapolis after a 23-day fast (The Minneapolis Journal claims she fasted for 39 days). She was one of the converts to the fast cure, whose faith in the system, as exploited by a woman physician, led her to adopt the course without hesitation when the doctor advised it.

Mrs. Young was afflicted with paralysis of the right side, and had been ill for several years. Six days before her death, the young woman abandoned fasting, and, it is said, ate too freely. An autopsy is in progress to decide the cause of death.

The news of Mrs. Young’s demise under such circumstances, proved quite a shock to the score or more of Minneapolitans who are now in various stages of the fasting cure. A sort of society of fasters has been formed among patients undergoing this treatment, and they held a meeting this afternoon to talk over the situation, but the proceedings are unobtainable.

One of the patients of the local doctor has been without food for 50 days, and he asserts that there is no doubt about the benefit he has derived from the treatment, while half a dozen other patients express confidence in the merits of the system.


Fasting patient Dora Williams after being rescued from a clinic run by the same doctor1

Mrs. Young was a widow. She had a stroke of paralysis about a year and a half, recovering very slowly. For six months or more she had been attending to her household duties, and had been considered in improved health.

The woman physician, when seen this afternoon, was emphatic in her characterization of the case. She asserts that when she was called to attend Mrs. Young, the case was turned over to her as one of ordinary paralysis, and she did not find, until her treatment had been in progress for more than two weeks, that there were conditions existing likely to preclude successful treatment.

The physician continued: “I dislike to make the statement which I shall be compelled to make if any official action holds me in any manner responsible for Mrs. Young’s death. The fasting system of cure has so many outright cures of difficult cases to its credit that its merits cannot be doubted by reasonable people, professional or otherwise, and the fuss that is being made about this death savors strongly of professional persecution.”

Friends of Mrs. Young assert that, prior to her commencement of the fasting period, she seemed in better health than she had been enjoying for a long time, and they do not hesitate to attribute her death to the lack of proper nourishment. It is said that a woman in her weakened physical condition could not fast 23-days without being driven to the verge of physical exhaustion.

An autopsy was performed at the state university this afternoon by Coroner Williams, who found that Mrs. Young’s death was caused by exhaustion, due to starvation.

Dr. Williams will lay the matter before the county attorney, with a view to putting a stop to the fasting cure fad.

The Saint Paul Globe; “Faster Dies of Lack of Food. Mrs. Gertrude Young, of Minneapolis, Expires After 23 Days’ Abstinence. Other Converts to the theory Become Worried. Woman Physician Who Prescribed the Fasting Cure Complains That she Was Not Informed of Existing Conditions That Precluded successful Treatment—Makes charge of Professional Persecution.”; Nov. 20, 20, 1902; p. 3.

The Minneapolis Journal; “Starved To Death. Mrs. Gertrude Young Was Going Without Food To Regain her health. She Had “Taken the Cure” for Thirty-nine Days When Death Came.”; Nov. 19, 1902; p. 6.

1http://www.historylink.org/db_images/DoraWilliamsonStarvingBeforeRescue.jpg

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While neither The Saint Paul Globe nor The Minneapolis Journal article gave the woman physician’s name, Mrs. Young’s obituary in the River Falls Journal, Nov. 20, 1902, says she was Dr. Linda Perry, better known as Dr. Linda Burfield Hazzard, the famous starvation doctor.





http://unknownmisandry.blogspot.com/2011/09/linda-burfield-hazzard-medical-serial.html


Dr. Linda Hazzard, formerly of Minneapolis, Minn., charged with murder in the first degree, was unable to obtain $10,000 bail; see 
Aug. 7, 2016 blog.

The Wash. State Supreme Court today upheld the first degree murder conviction of Dr. Linda Burfield Hazzard, known as the “starvation doctor.”; see Aug. 12, 2016 blog.

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