Friday, November 24, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 24

November 24, 1916 – The St. Louis County grand jury today returned indictments naming Victor Power, mayor of Hibbing; D. D. McEachin, former village treasurer W. J. Ryder, Rupert Swinnerton, B. J. Burrows and H. P. Curran, members of the Hibbing village council, and Albert Dixon and Jacob Messier, for alleged malfeasance in office and alleged misappropriation of public moneys.

C. M. Atkinson and R. W. Hitchcock, newspaper publishers, were also named for alleged complicity in obtaining public moneys fraudulently.

The men were arraigned before Judge W. A. Cant of the St. Louis county district court. Pleas will be made at Hibbing before Judge Hughes. Bail of $500 in each case was fixed.

John Mulvahill and Sam Sanderson, who also were indicted, did not appear in court.

The indicted men were represented by Attorney H. B. Fryberger, who raised an objection to the arraigning of the men in Duluth. The objection was overruled, but a request to allow the men to make their pleas at Hibbing was allowed.

No formal arrests were made by the sheriff, the men being called by telephone and told to appear before the court.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Mayor and Other Hibbing Officials Are Arraigned. Indictments Charge Misuse of Village Funds—No Formal Arrests.”; Nov.25, 1916; p. 1.




Victor Power, Mayor of Hibbing
http://hibbing.yolasite.com/resources/181438_173970146065939_100003588642413_236792_778260048_n.jpeg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Thursday, November 23, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 23

November 23, 1901 – The Minneapolis & St. Louis and the Omaha roads brought into Minneapolis today about 1,200 farmers, who were taken out to St. Louis Park and entertained by the Minnesota Sugar Company. They were shown through the plant by the officials and employees of the company and saw how the beet was converted into sugar, from the unloading of the cars until it was ready for use on the table. Many returned home this evening, but a number will remain in the cities for several days.

The Saint Paul Globe; “Saw Sugar Manufactured. Twelve Hundred Farmers Visit Beet Park Sugar Plant.”; Nov. 24, 1901; p. 8.




Minnesota Sugar Company, St. Louis Park, MN

http://slphistory.org/sugarbeet/

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                        


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Wednesday, November 22, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 22

November 22, 1904 – Nine-year-old Freddie King was killed and Edward J. Mingo probably fatally shot by masked men who held up the saloon at Columbia Heights, just outside the limits of Minneapolis and in Anoka County, this evening.

The incident occurred about 9 p.m. and at midnight the body of the little boy lay on a table in the saloon awaiting the arrival of the Anoka County coroner.

The murder was a most cold-blooded one. Three men and one woman were involved, and the prospects of their arrest are believed to be excellent.

This evening there was a turkey raffle at Edward Mingo’s saloon, in Anoka County, just across the line from Hennepin County.


The Village of Columbia Heights was formed on March 14, 1898 when it separated from Fridley Township. With 1696 acres, 100 citizens, and 20 houses, paths became roads, traffic patterns emerged, and a city began. The city name was selected by contest.1


The raffle was managed by M. E. Hickman and Henry Phol, a former Minneapolis policeman and at one time the proprietor of the saloon.

Shortly before 9 p.m. three masked men entered the place and began shooting. The first shot was directed at Edward J. Mingo, the bartender, who was behind the counter, and he received a shot in the left side of the face. The bullet passed through his mouth and lodged in the vicinity of the base of his brain.

Then the robbers opened fire on Hickman, who was behind several crates of turkeys and who was in charge of the raffle.

Little Freddie King stood in front of the crate, watching the manipulations of the man with the wheels and the paddles. When he heard the shots Freddie turned around. As he did so, the robbers shot at Hickman, but aimed low and the bullet entered the body of the little child. With a wild cry, he started for the side door and fell to the walk as soon as he passed through.


Inside the Mingo Saloon
2

The robbers continued shooting and one shot passed near proprietor Edward Mingo, and as Frank Mingo, a relative of the manager, descended the stairs, he, too, was the target of the thugs. They fired at him but missed. Then the men in the saloon were lined up and searched by the outlaws, securing about $15 from the till; Charles Monroe added $2.50 and several others gave up smaller amounts.

The murderers then departed and entered two wagons, which had been held for them by a woman, who stood nearby.

As soon as the men in the saloon recovered from their fright, they made a search for the murderers, and in a short while, William Spain, one of the trustees of the village, returned with with a brown sweater and a red handkerchief, like those that one of the robbers wore, which was discovered near the scene of the shooting.

A little later a duck coat, similar to the one worn by one of the men, a blue handkerchief, a sweater, muffler and a cap covered with gray horse hairs were found near the Soo tracks just below the scene of the shooting.

From all reports the shooters had two wagons in waiting and started for the city, but changed their minds and made their way to the east for the purpose of taking the Soo freight train for the east.

Their tracks were followed for some distance, but they doubled on their trail. A number of Minneapolis policemen boarded the Soo train that passed Central Ave. about midnight for the purpose of making a thorough search of the train.

A crowd came and gaped at the bloody body of the child, and finally one of the newspaper men suggested to one of the employees of the house, that it might be a proper thing to cover the body with a sheet. This was done.

J. H. King, a painter and decorator, is the boy’s father. He did not want to attend the raffle tonight, but some of his friends insisted that he should and to accommodate them he went. Freddie, the oldest of four, insisted that he should accompany him, and against his will he consented to permit the little one to go. At the time of the shooting, Mr. King was standing at the side of the hall and the boy stood directly in the range of fire.


Freddie King with his siblings
3


The Saint Paul Globe; “Masked Robbers Shoot Up Saloon. Kill Boy and Seriously Wound Bartender. Three Men Armed With Guns Interrupt Turkey Raffle at Columbia Heights—Woman Outside Holds horses While Bandits Kill Little Freddie King and Hold Up Men in Place—Murderers Make Their Escape Before Village Is Aroused.”; Nov. 23, 1904; pp. 1 & 8.

1https://www.columbiaheightsmn.gov/community/history_of_columbia_heights/index.php

2The Minneapolis Tribune; Nov. 24, 1904; p. 2.

3The Minneapolis Tribune; Nov. 24, 1904; p. 1.

To be continued….


               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Tuesday, November 21, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 21

November 21, 1913 – Harry Mont, also known as Andrew Montfelt, a convict, jumped into the doorway of a boxcar while a train was moving out of the new Stillwater prison yard late today.

A guard gave the alarm and a wall sentinel joined in the chase with a repeating rifle. Outside the yard the convict jumped from the moving train and started through the marsh to the St. Croix River, a mile away.

He was in a boat when he was frightened into surrendering by shots from the guards.

Mont was sent to the reformatory at St. Cloud from Duluth, Aug. 10, 1910, for grand larceny, and was transferred to the state prison June 28, 1912, for incorrigibility. He is wanted as a deserter from the navy.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Convict Attempts to Escape. Harry Mont Gets as Far as Boat in River, Then Surrenders.”; Nov. 22, 1913; p. 2.





Photos taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain July 10, 2014,
as long as acknowledgement included.
 

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                        


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Monday, November 20, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 20

November 20, 1912 – The corner stone of the Grand Army of the Republic (G. A. R.) monument being built in Bemidji’s Greenwood Cemetery was laid this afternoon in front of fifty to sixty people. The stone was a cube of St. Cloud granite, of which the monument is being constructed; each dimension being six feet and weighing six tons. It was laid on a base of concrete and will be covered by a smaller stone above which the column will rise.

At the exercises were the members of the G. A. R., Women’s Relief Corps, city and county officials and members of the council. In the corner stone was placed a copper casket that will be sealed in the stone. The casket contains copies of the Pioneer and Sentinel, a Lincoln bronze medal, a G. A. R. badge and button made from a captured Confederate cannon, a small United States flag, a list of the members of both the men and women’s G. A. R. orders and the city and county officials.

In the casket was also placed a piece of pine stump that came from the prison at Andersonville, Ga. This prison was one of the worst in the south and at one time housed 30,000 men who were forced to depend on a filthy stream for drinking water. Thousands were dying daily when a spring appeared from underneath a pine stump and furnished enough pure water to supply the camp. L. G. Pendergast was given a piece of the pine stump and that is the piece placed in the monument.

In a brief speech, L. G. Pendergast outlined the movement that resulted in the monument, saying that the money was raised by the G. A. R., Women’s Relief Corps, Commercial Club, city of Bemidji, Beltrami County and school children of the county. He laid emphasis on the fact that the monument is being raised to all men and women who had a part in the war, whether they were in the service of their country on land or sea, whether officer or private. P. J. Russell lauded the G. A. R. and the work of the Grand Army during the war.

The monument will be dedicated next Memorial Day. It will be 24-feet high, is set on the basic block of six foot cube and will cost between $1,300 and $1,400 before finished. A tablet saying “In Memory of the Veterans of the Civil War—1912” is on the smaller stone. The monument is located in the southwest corner of the cemetery and can be plainly seen from the road.

Bemidji Pioneer Daily; “Corner Stone Laid Wednesday”; Nov. 21, 1912; p. 1.




http://rachaelhanel.me/2014/07/25/greenwood-cemetery-bemidji-minnesota/

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Sunday, November 19, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 19

November 19, 1902 – Mrs. Gertrude Young passed away today in Minneapolis after a 23-day fast (The Minneapolis Journal claims she fasted for 39 days). She was one of the converts to the fast cure, whose faith in the system, as exploited by a woman physician, led her to adopt the course without hesitation when the doctor advised it.

Mrs. Young was afflicted with paralysis of the right side, and had been ill for several years. Six days before her death, the young woman abandoned fasting, and, it is said, ate too freely. An autopsy is in progress to decide the cause of death.

The news of Mrs. Young’s demise under such circumstances, proved quite a shock to the score or more of Minneapolitans who are now in various stages of the fasting cure. A sort of society of fasters has been formed among patients undergoing this treatment, and they held a meeting this afternoon to talk over the situation, but the proceedings are unobtainable.

One of the patients of the local doctor has been without food for 50 days, and he asserts that there is no doubt about the benefit he has derived from the treatment, while half a dozen other patients express confidence in the merits of the system.


Fasting patient Dora Williams after being rescued from a clinic run by the same doctor1

Mrs. Young was a widow. She had a stroke of paralysis about a year and a half, recovering very slowly. For six months or more she had been attending to her household duties, and had been considered in improved health.

The woman physician, when seen this afternoon, was emphatic in her characterization of the case. She asserts that when she was called to attend Mrs. Young, the case was turned over to her as one of ordinary paralysis, and she did not find, until her treatment had been in progress for more than two weeks, that there were conditions existing likely to preclude successful treatment.

The physician continued: “I dislike to make the statement which I shall be compelled to make if any official action holds me in any manner responsible for Mrs. Young’s death. The fasting system of cure has so many outright cures of difficult cases to its credit that its merits cannot be doubted by reasonable people, professional or otherwise, and the fuss that is being made about this death savors strongly of professional persecution.”

Friends of Mrs. Young assert that, prior to her commencement of the fasting period, she seemed in better health than she had been enjoying for a long time, and they do not hesitate to attribute her death to the lack of proper nourishment. It is said that a woman in her weakened physical condition could not fast 23-days without being driven to the verge of physical exhaustion.

An autopsy was performed at the state university this afternoon by Coroner Williams, who found that Mrs. Young’s death was caused by exhaustion, due to starvation.

Dr. Williams will lay the matter before the county attorney, with a view to putting a stop to the fasting cure fad.

The Saint Paul Globe; “Faster Dies of Lack of Food. Mrs. Gertrude Young, of Minneapolis, Expires After 23 Days’ Abstinence. Other Converts to the theory Become Worried. Woman Physician Who Prescribed the Fasting Cure Complains That she Was Not Informed of Existing Conditions That Precluded successful Treatment—Makes charge of Professional Persecution.”; Nov. 20, 20, 1902; p. 3.

The Minneapolis Journal; “Starved To Death. Mrs. Gertrude Young Was Going Without Food To Regain her health. She Had “Taken the Cure” for Thirty-nine Days When Death Came.”; Nov. 19, 1902; p. 6.

1http://www.historylink.org/db_images/DoraWilliamsonStarvingBeforeRescue.jpg

 ______________________

While neither The Saint Paul Globe nor The Minneapolis Journal article gave the woman physician’s name, Mrs. Young’s obituary in the River Falls Journal, Nov. 20, 1902, says she was Dr. Linda Perry, better known as Dr. Linda Burfield Hazzard, the famous starvation doctor.





http://unknownmisandry.blogspot.com/2011/09/linda-burfield-hazzard-medical-serial.html


Dr. Linda Hazzard, formerly of Minneapolis, Minn., charged with murder in the first degree, was unable to obtain $10,000 bail; see 
Aug. 7, 2016 blog.

The Wash. State Supreme Court today upheld the first degree murder conviction of Dr. Linda Burfield Hazzard, known as the “starvation doctor.”; see Aug. 12, 2016 blog.

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Saturday, November 18, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 18

*November 18, 1902 – While peacefully sleeping off the effects of last night’s bender, Joseph Moran, a juror in the case of the state against Charley Riley, who is being tried in district court for grand larceny in the first degree, was arrested in bed at the St. James Hotel about 10:30 this morning on an attachment issued by Judge Dibell. Moran was held in contempt of court at his 11 a.m. hearing, and was sentenced to three days in the county jail and to pay a fine of $25. In default of the fine he will have to stay 25 days in jail. A stay of execution of judgment was ordered by the court until after the case now on trial is disposed of.

When the Riley case was called in Judge Dibell’s room this morning at 9:30, 11 jurors responded to the roll call. The trial could not proceed without the full quota and after waiting an hour for Juror Moran to appear, the court finally issued the attachment for contempt of court.



St. Louis County Courthouse, Duluth, Minn.1

Deputy Sheriff H. N. Randall served the attachment and found the door to Moran’s room at the hotel locked from the inside. Efforts to arouse the inmate of the room from the outside did not work, and the officer finally gained entrance through a side window. When Moran was awakened he was still under the impression that it was night and the officer had hard work making him understand what was wanted.

When questioned by the court, Deputy Randall said Moran’s breath smelled strongly of liquor, and he was a little unsteady on his feet.

Juror Moran, who is a homesteader residing about ten miles north of Hibbing, pleaded in extenuation that he overslept this morning and the hotel clerk did not awaken him according to orders. Questioned further by the court he admitted that he had visited several saloons last evening.

Moran told the court that the only excuse that he had for drinking was the fact that he only came to the city at long intervals, his testimony showing that the strenuousness of city life was a little too much for him.



The Big City of Duluth in May 19022


He claimed that he was sober enough to sit with the rest of the jury and hear testimony, but this was demurred to by the county attorney and the counsel for the defense, and the court was not inclined to punish the rest of the jurors by bringing them in proximity with the erring juror’s breath, although the offender claimed it did not bother him any.

Court was adjourned until 2 p.m. when the trial of Riley was to be resumed providing Juror Moran was in proper condition.

Duluth Evening Herald; “A Juror Has a Jag. John Moran Is Given a Stiff Fine For Contempt. Failed to Show Up In the Riley Larceny Case. Court Was Adjourned to Allow Him to Sober Up.”; Nov. 18, 1902; p. 2.

1http://zenithcity.com/archive/lost-architecture/st-louis-county-courthouse-1883/

2https://i.pinimg.com/736x/ef/4f/2b/ef4f2b91e1a76b142c87d53fbceb3031--duluth-minnesota-north-shore.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com





Friday, November 17, 2017

On this Date in Minnesota History: November 17

November 17, 1863 – Winfield Scott Hammond, the 18th governor of Minnesota, was born on this date in Southborough, Massachusetts. Hammond had been in office only eight months when he suffered ptomaine poisoning on a trip south and died of a stroke, aged 52, in Clinton, Louisiana. He died on December 30, 1915, the second governor to die while in office.

http://www.mnopedia.org/thisday

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winfield_Scott_Hammond




Gov. Winfield Scott Hammond
https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/mankatofreepress.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/c2/bc28b824-b72b-5200-a296-60d7065939e3/596b67a49905f.image.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Thursday, November 16, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 16

November 16, 1906 – It was announced today that the sawmill of the Winona Lumber Company will not open again next season, having been closed permanently when the last log for this season was sawed on Wednesday. This is the third Winona sawmill to close in the last few years, and there remains only the mill of the Empire Lumber Company, which will remain in operation for two or three more years.


*


The reason for the closing of this mill is the lack of log supply owned by the proprietor of the mill. Practically all of their own logs are used and they find it too expensive to operate the mill on logs purchased in the open market. The Youmans Bros. & Hodgins Mill was the first was the first to close for this reason some years ago and the mill of the Laird-Norton Company was shut down last fall.

The exhaustion of the log supply was hurried forward several years by the great forest fires in Wisconsin some years ago. If the millions of feet of timber that burned could have been saved, the mills of Winona and others along the upper Mississippi could have been kept in operation a number of years.

The Minneapolis Tribune; “Winona Sawmills Close for Good. Three Concerns Will Not Open Again Next Season. Lack of Logs Is the Cause of Suspension. Great Forest Fires in Wisconsin Hurried Death of industry.”; November 17, 1906; p. 3.

*https://people.uwec.edu/ivogeler/w368/slides/ec1.gif




https://i.pinimg.com/originals/1f/e7/b0/1fe7b0bf516766b83c9d3ffbdbeb3a57.jpg
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                        


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Wednesday, November 15, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 15

November 15, 20101 – Seventeen-year-old Michael Swanson of St. Louis Park, Minn., steals his mother’s Jeep and credit cards, drives north to the family cabin in Bigfork, Minn., where he takes a gun, then drives south to Iowa and murders two convenience store clerks; one in Humboldt, and the other in Algona.

1http://blogs.citypages.com/blotter/2010/11/michael_swanson.php

http://www.startribune.com/local/west/124427454.html

http://blogs.citypages.com/blotter/2010/12/michael_swanson_1.php




http://article.wn.com/view/2011/06/21/SWANSON_TRIAL_Testimony_has_begun_in_the_first_murder_trial_/

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

On this Date in Minnesota History: November 14

November 14, 2012 - Born in Little Falls, Minn., Native American author Louise Erdrich won the 2012 National Book Award for Fiction on this date for her novel “The Round House,”1 about a “teenage boy on a North Dakota reservation who tries to solve the mystery of his mother’s brutal rape.”2

1http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louise_Erdrich

2
http://www.startribune.com/entertainment/books/202879531.html



Author Louise Erdrich

http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/erdrich/erdrich.htm


               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Monday, November 13, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 13

November 13, 1984 – Princeton benefactor and convicted cocaine smuggler Casey Ramirez was sentenced to 20 years in prison by U.S. District Judge Edward Demitt. “Ramirez received a $50,000 fine in addition to the prison term on one count of conspiring to smuggle cocaine and a second count of conspiring to possess and distribute the drug in the United States.”

St. Paul Pioneer Press; “Ramirez gets 20-year term in drug use”; November 14, 1984; pp. 1A & 4A.



Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain January 15, 2015,
as long as acknowledgement included.
 

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                        


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com