Saturday, March 4, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: March 4

March 4, 2001 – “Former Minnesota 3-term Gov. Harold E. Stassen died at age 93.”

http://timelines.ws/states/MINNESOTA.HTML




Harold E. Stassen
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:HaroldStassenOfficialOil.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Friday, March 3, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: March 3

March 3, 1910 – An emphatic denial to the story that a brewery was to be established at the university farm school was made by Dean A. F. Woods, head of the college of agriculture. A university publication today said: “A fully equipped brewery is the latest proposed addition to the university. Not satisfied with ‘kraut’ canneries, pretzel bakeries and cheese factories, the agricultural college is to add a new feature to the already Bohemian life.”

Dean Woodward contradicted the story. “There is absolutely no truth in the story. I do not know what the writer could have meant unless it was the new denatured alcohol plant, for which the last legislature appropriated $6,000. Professor Hoagland, of the chemical department, is preparing the plans for this experimental distillery of denatured alcohol and it will probably be finished this coming summer. But there will be no brewery on this farm, nor is beer to be manufactured here.”

President Northrup jokingly said, “I do not think the university will establish a brewery. The experimental farm is not allowed to compete with the industries of the state, and I do not think that the farm students could drink all the beer we could brew. We shall not establish a brewery, even for experimental purposes.”

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Brewery at Farm School? ‘No!’ Thunders the Dean”; March 4, 1910; p. 2.


Farm, St. Paul, University of Minnesota, 1910

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/2e/5d/55/2e5d55d7575d666d1aa8f96f4872a361.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com 

Thursday, March 2, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: March 2

March 2, 1915 – President Woodrow Wilson met one of the greatest champions this country, and this state, has produced. Only 16 years old, this champion raised 115.05 bushels of corn on an acre of Minnesota soil; a champion worthy of shaking the hand of the President of the United Stated.

At least the President thought so, and Roy Halvorson, champion corn grower of Kirkhoven, Minn., agreed with him.

So today, in the midst of work related to the closing of Congress, in the midst of international complications, between Cabinet meetings and while Cabinet officers and foreign ambassadors waited, Halvorson was introduced to the President.

The Minnesota corn champion, accompanied by Margaret Lofgren of Ulen and Florence  Frargollauf, Sauk Rapids, champion breadmakers, called on President Wilson.

There were other champion corn growers in the party and the President took the time to stop and ask them how they raised their record yields of corn.



Minnesota Corn1


Afterwards, the party visited the Treasury Building and the Agriculture Department, went to visit the home of George Washington at Mount Vernon and returned to Washington a tired and sleepy lot, but very contented with what they had seen and done.

Tomorrow they will visit the Capitol and see Congress in action.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “President Wilson Meets Minnesota Champions. Prize Corn Growers and Breadmakers Introduced to the Nation’s Executive. Ambassadors Wait While Boys and Girls see the President.”; March 3, 1915; p. 1.

1http://www.mn2020.org/assets/uploads/article/economic_development/corn_ears.jpg




http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-aHyyciDUliM/T5yYd31-cxI/AAAAAAAAVV0/Kp-mKZhnV1w/s1600/SAM%2B004.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com 

 


Wednesday, March 1, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: March 1

March 1, 1921 – Jury service for women in Minnesota was carried a step nearer to realization today when committees of both House and Senate recommended for passage three bills designed to place women on the same footing with men, so far as such service is concerned.

The House adopted the report of its judiciary committee at the afternoon session. The Senate is expected to adopt the report of its committee tomorrow.

The first bill admits women to jury service. The second provides for a woman bailiff for service in connection with mixed juries. The third has to do with exemptions for women summoned for jury duty.

In the Senate committee the first two bills were recommended with little discussion. It was on the question of the exemptions that there were real differences of opinion.

The bill, as originally introduced by Senator George Turnham, provided for exemptions for women nursing babies or small children. Two attempts to extend the exemptions failed and the committee finally recommended the bill as drafted.

Senator Hall led the fight for extending the exemptions. An amendment to require the court to excuse any woman who wanted to be excused was presented. It was turned down by a vote of 10 to 4. Senator Devold, Minneapolis Socialist, insisted that such an amendment would simply mean that juries would be made up of “idle women of the rich, seeking new thrills.”

Senator Gjerset presented an amendment that would permit the court to excuse any woman from jury service if, in the judgment of the court, her reason was sufficient. This amendment was defeated by a vote of eight to six.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Three Bills to Admit Women as Jurors Are Step Nearer Passage.”; March 2, 1921; p. 1.


Reason Why Women Shouldn’t Be Jurors According to a Newspaper Cartoon:


 Women could be influenced by handsome male defendants



http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ON5Oi1E24po/TeKYcYNvCtI/AAAAAAAAAJE/pkMOTf0Z8dc/s1600/Trial+by+Jury+Portland+Evening+Telegram+December+4+1912+1.jpg

Portland Evening Telegram; "Trial by Jury,"; Dec. 4, 1912; p. 1.

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com 

 

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: February 28

February 28, 1896 – Philip Showalter Hench, an American physician known for his work in rheumatology, was born on this date. In 1948, while working at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Hench noticed that during pregnancy and in the presence of jaundice the severe pain of arthritis may decrease and even disappear. With Edward Kendall, he successfully applied an adrenal hormone (later known as cortisone) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

In 1950, Hench shared the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine with Kendall and Tadeus Reichstein for discoveries relating to the hormones of the adrenal cortex, their structure and biological effects.

https://todayinsci.com/2/2_28.htm




Philip Showalter Hench
http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1950/hench.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com   




Monday, February 27, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: February 27

February 27, 1911 – Today the Minnesota Senate went on record in favor of Sunday baseball. It killed Senator Sageng’s bill repealing the law permitting the exercise of the great American sport on the Sabbath. On the final vote there were 20 senators opposed to Sunday baseball and 27 for it.

The bill came up in the committee of the whole where Senator Stebbins of Rochester moved its indefinite postponement. Senator Stebbins said his constituents were in favor of Sunday baseball.

Senator Sageng, the lone Populist from Otter Tail, objected. He said that no bill passed in the 1903 session had caused so much criticism as the Sunday baseball measure. On a rising vote Senator Stebbins’ measure prevailed 27 to 17.

When the committee made its report Senator Sageng moved the report be rejected and the bill placed on the calendar. He demanded a roll call and on this motion were 20 yeas and 27 nays, reflecting the attitude on Sunday baseball.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Sunday Ball Games Get Senate Sanction. Sageng Bill Prohibiting the National Sport on Sabbath Is Laid Away. By Vote of 27 to 20, Solons Stand for Indefinite Postponement. Otter Tail Member Makes a Fight for His Measure, But Loses.”; Feb. 28, 1911; p. 1.



1911 Minneapolis Millers Cap

http://strictlyfitteds.com/sites/default/files/ebbets-minneappolis-millers-1911-fitted.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com 

 



Sunday, February 26, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: February 26

February 26, 1951 – On this date, Minnesota was the 36th state (of 41 total) to ratify the 22nd Amendment to the U. S. Constitution. This amendment limited a U. S. president to two terms in office. At the time, ratification required 36 states out of 48; today, ratification would require 38 states out of 50.

http://www.440int.com/twtd/archives/feb26.html




https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BhgFlbkCUAAbslO.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com