Saturday, May 13, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 13

May 13, 1909 – Louis Arbogast, a wealthy butcher who operated a large and successful meat market at Seven Corners in St. Paul, Minn., was murdered this morning while sleeping in his bed at his home on West 7th Street.


Arbogast Home1



His head was crushed, and the police reported that his bed was saturated with gasoline and set on fire. Following blood drops on the floor, authorities discovered an axe covered with blood and wrapped in some old clothing in the cellar.




This photo of the interior of the room at the Arbogast home indicates the terrible fury and desperation of purpose of the person or persons who killed Arbogast by cutting his head open with repeated blows of a heavy ax. Arbogast was lying on the left side of the bed, Mrs. Arbogast on the right side. It will be noticed that both pillows are covered with blood and that the keen ax blade had so cut into the pillows and customary German feather bed covering as to allow most of the feathers to billow out of the mattress and the pillow on which Arbogast slept. Blood is spattered on the walls, both at the head and the side of the bed. The police maintain that the fact that blood is on Mrs. Arbogast’s pillow, as well as on her husband’s, indicates that she was not in the bed when Arbogast was killed.2


Stories told by the widow, Minna Arbogast and her daughters Ida and Louise did not agree, and seemed to change with each telling. In one story, Ida told police that she smelled smoke, went to her parents’ bedroom, and found their bed burning with her parents in it.

“I dragged my mother out,” she said. “Neighbors put out the fire. My father, partly burned, was unconscious, and died on the way to the hospital.”

Minna told police that she was in the bathroom when she heard her daughter scream. Upon running into the bedroom, she saw her husband in the blazing bed. In one story, she fainted and fell against the bed, whereby she received some burns. In another version, she received her burns from trying to pull her husband out of the bed.

All of the windows and door locks in the house were found intact, and police began to believe the murder was committed by someone in the household.



Window of bedroom where Arbogast was killed1


At first, police believed Minna committed the murder in a state of rage after rumors claimed she had discovered that Louise and her husband not only worked together at the meat market, but were also comrades “in the most intimate sense.”

Then, authorities began to look at the oldest daughter, Louise, who, it was said, had not been mentally right for several years. When quite young, she began to visit fortune tellers and kept it up until it amounted to a passion with her. As a result of what the fortune tellers told her, Louise had developed a firm hallucination that she and her sister were being pursued by a mysterious man. Her condition became such that last winter she was sent to St. Luke’s Hospital, but her father had pressed for early release, despite warnings from the doctors that she may become violent. She had only recently returned home, apparently cured of her hallucinations, but at intervals her mind returned to fortune telling and such arts, until again she became thoroughly obsessed.

A few days after his death, Louise was arrested for the murder of her father. On June 7, Minna and Louise were indicted by a grand jury. Both women plead not guilty to the murder. Because of Louise’s past problems, she underwent a sanity hearing and was found to be sane. She was released on bail on July 14. Minna’s trial began in Oct., and she was acquitted and released on Nov. 4, 1909. The indictment against Louise was quashed on Dec. 3, 1909. No new evidence was found against Louise and it appeared the chances of her conviction, based on Minna’s acquittal, were very unlikely.

The murder was never solved.



Mr. and Mrs. Arbogast3


https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=64876864&ref=acom  


The Minneapolis Morning Tribune
; “Murder of Butcher Solved by Police? St. Paul Officers Said to Know Who Killed Arbogast. Victim Found on Flaming Bed With His Head Crushed.”; May 14, 1909; p. 8.

Duluth Evening Herald; “Mystery; No Confession. All the Evidence at Hand Is only Circumstantial. Mrs. Arbogast, the Widow, Remains in the Hospital. Brewer Schwan of Eau Claire Takes Charge of Family.”; May 15, 1909; pp. 1 & 6.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “ Louise Arbogast Brained Father, Mother Asserts. Mrs. Arbogast Breaks Down and Charges Daughter With Murder. Struck Her Mother With a Hammer Night Before the Tragedy.”; May 18, 1909; p. 6.


1St. Paul Dispatch; May 13, 1909; p. 13.

2St. Paul Dispatch; May 15, 1909; p. 3.

3Duluth Evening Herald, May 15, 1909; p. 1.

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com



Friday, May 12, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 12

May 12, 1905 – Harvey S. Rogers, sent to Stillwater less than one month ago for a year’s sentence, was accidentally killed today in the state prison. He was 35-years-old. While cleaning out waste from under a twine spinning machine, his clothing was caught and before his co-worker could stop the machine, Rogers was crushed to death. His skull was horribly fractured.



Twine shop in Stillwater Prison1

An ambulance was instantly sent for and the body was taken to the hospital, where the coroner of Washington County will hold an inquest tomorrow.

Rogers was sentenced April 17 by Judge William Lochren of the United States district court for using the mails with intent to defraud.

He had invented several fictitious companies that offered work at home, directions and information costing $1. He had previously been on trial in the United States court while a postal clerk on the charge of stealing money from the mails.

Rogers was an exceptionally bright young fellow. He was known by hundreds of people in Minneapolis, having been a clerk in the post office for 16 years and having served through the Philippine war with the Thirteenth Minnesota.

On the day off his acquittal, when he was tried in the United States court for stealing from the mails, his father died. It was commonly supposed that he had inherited a considerable fortune. However, he was fascinated by the love of trying to get something for nothing, and like the vast majority of people who once use the mails to defraud, was unable to stop his attempts. He was an exemplary prisoner.

Minneapolis Journal; “Meets Death in Prison. Harvey C. Rogers, Sent to Stillwater Last Month, Killed Instantly by Twine Machine.”; May 13, 1905; p. 6.

1http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/200209/04_ap_prisonfire/slideshowhistory/5.shtml



Stillwater Prison - 1902

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:MNStatePrisonStillwater1902.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com





Thursday, May 11, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 11

May 11, 1912 – Two were killed almost instantly while two others of a party were seriously injured as a result of an auto accident at Argyle, nine miles north of Warren, Minn., at 4 p.m. today. The car and its occupants were struck by a southbound Great Northern freight locomotive.

The locomotive was running about 20 miles an hour. All of the occupants were thrown clear of the car.


The Dead:

Miss Lou Tiedt, 30-years-old, Argyle, Minn.

Miss Anna Misner, Euclid, Minn.


The Injured:


Miss L. Misner, Euclid, Minn.

Victor Tiedt, Argyle, Minn., driver of the car, badly bruised about the body.


Miss Lou Tiedt, sister of the driver and daughter of the most prominent merchant of Argyle, was dead when the train crew and others rushed to give assistance. The Misses Misner, members of the most prominent families in Polk County, were visiting in Argyle. They arrived there early today and intended to leave on an evening train for home.

It is said that Mr. Tiedt attempted to cross the tracks ahead of the train, and the car engine died as the vehicle reached the track. Other witnesses assert the train was hidden from view by a few trees a short distance back, and that the auto party did not notice the train in time to stop, but put on more speed in an attempt to cross safely.


The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Two Killed, Two Injured When auto Hits Auto. Argyle and Euclid Minn. Residents Victims of Accident at Former Town. Occupants Thrown Clear of the Machine—Cause of Crash Uncertain.”; May 12, 1912; p. 1.




http://ci.argyle.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/cropped-argyle-sign.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com





Wednesday, May 10, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 10

May 10, 1823 - The Virginia is the first steamboat to reach Fort St. Anthony (later named Fort Snelling), having made the 729-mile-trip from St. Louis in 20 days. Among the Virginia 's passengers is Italian explorer and adventurer Giacomo C. Beltrami.1

The explorer is best known for claiming to have discovered the headwaters of the Mississippi River in 1823 while on a trip through much of the United States (later expeditions determined a different source, however). Beltrami County in Minn. is named after him.2


1http://www.mnopedia.org/thisday

2https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giacomo_Beltrami



Giacomo C. Beltrami

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giacomo_Beltrami#/media/File:GCBeltrami.jpg


               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com





Tuesday, May 9, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 9

May 9, 1887 – “The Flint Furniture factory in Faribault [Minn.] burned [on this date]. Built in 1856, the factory was the first in the state to manufacture items for wholesale trade.”

http://www.thehistorypeople.com/data/docs/timeline-part1.pdf




http://www.lakesnwoods.com/images/Fariba119.jpg
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                       


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com



Monday, May 8, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 8

*May 8, 1984 – Kirby Puckett “became only the 9th player in history to record 4 hits in the first full game of a career, by going 4 for 5 against the California Angels.”

http://www.nutcan.com/article/The_Five_Most_Important_Figures_in_Minnesota_Sports_History.php



Kirby Puckett
http://z.lee28.tripod.com/sbnsperspectives/id5.html

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                        


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com



Sunday, May 7, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 7

May 7, 1915 - This afternoon, the British ocean liner Lusitania was torpedoed without warning by a German submarine off the south coast of Ireland. Within 20 minutes, the vessel sank into the Celtic Sea. Of 1,959 passengers and crew, 1,198 people were drowned, including 128 Americans. The attack aroused considerable indignation in the United States, but Germany defended the action, noting that it had issued warnings of its intent to attack all ships, neutral or otherwise, that entered the war zone around Britain.1

 

Sinking of the Lusitania2 


 One of the passengers that drown was Millie Baker, 27, an American opera singer from Duluth, Minn. She had been training her voice in France and Spain since 1909, and was hoping to make her stage debut with the Opera Comique. Millie was traveling aboard Lusitania with her fiancĂ© Charles Williamson, in cabins facing each other. Her ticket was 46059 and she stayed in cabin B-38. Williamson, on the same ticket, was in B-34. Both she and Williamson were lost in sinking of the Lusitania.3



Opera singer Millie Baker4

1http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/lusitania-sinks

2http://www.slate.com/content/dam/slate/articles/news_and_politics/history/2015/05/150505_HIST_Lusitania_sinking.jpg.CROP.original-original.jpg

3http://www.rmslusitania.info/people/saloon/millie-baker/

4https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/43/b0/a5/43b0a56aea197ed2d0d5bffe1e16cd47.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                     


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com