Saturday, June 24, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: June 24

June 24, 1911 – Governor Eberhart, Virginia Mayor Hawkinson, Secretary Archer of the Virginia [Minn.] Commercial Club and Eveleth Mayor Saari were arrested this afternoon in Virginia for speeding their automobile over 30 miles an hour. They were running to catch a train at the Iron Range depot, two miles from the city park where the governor had made his address.

When the policeman’s order to halt was ignored, he pulled his revolver. The auto had gone too far ahead and the party escaped. The governor made his train just in time.

The Minneapolis Sunday Tribune; “Police Shoots at Eberhart. Minnesota Governor and Party Arrested for Speeding Auto at Virginia.”; June 25, 1911; p. 1.




http://www.mnopedia.org/sites/default/files/styles/article_main/public/pof00180.jpg?itok=UsvpipDX

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com





Friday, June 23, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: June 23

June 23, 1913 – According to today’s The Minneapolis Morning Tribune, the “Curlew,” a government fisheries steamer, working out of Homer station, has begun planting clam spawn. The “Curlew” will be all summer in this work at different points on the Mississippi River.

Until about 10 years ago clams of every variety were plentiful in the upper Mississippi, until the button industry grew out of all proportion to the number of shells that could be caught. This was caused by a non-conservative spirit of the clam fisher. He drained the river of shells and left no means whereby others could grow.

Clam Shell “Pearl Buttons”1


 In 1908 Dr. Curtis and professor La Feve, who were students and are now teaching at the University of Columbia in Missouri, spent several months in studying the clam in this section. Their research led them to the study of the clam spawn, the different variety of shells, their value commercially, and the length of time it took the clam to mature the full growth shell. At this time they learned that five years was the length of time from the egg to the larger shell, and that in order for the egg to mature it must come in contact with the gills, fins or tail of a fish. The report of Dr. Curtis and Professor La Feve was sent to the government fisheries bureau. In it was seen the need of immediate action being taken to save the clam from extinction.


The crew on the “Curlew” use fishing nets and hooks on the river to collect the best varieties of game fish that are necessary for the life of the clam. The fish are put in tanks on board the steamer, where they are sorted, only the best adult fish being used. Live clams are brought in large numbers and a little bag containing the spawn is opened. Each clam contains several hundred eggs. When examined under a powerful microscope the tiny shell is visible. These eggs are put in tanks with the fish, and as the fish move through the water, the tiny eggs lodge themselves on some part of the fish. When they come in contact with the fish their life begins, and they do not drop off until they are of proper size.

When the egg leaves the fish, wherever it drops it begins to feed. At this time of the year the mucket, one of the best varieties of the clam, is the only kind that is spawning. Other varsities have different times in the year to spawn. The length of time that the egg is in contact with the fish is about 15 days, according to the season.

Experimenting in clam shells has helped to discover that for commercial uses the clams of Lake Pepin on the Mississippi River are the best that can be obtained in this part of the country. This is the variety that the “Curlew” is distributing.



Lake Pepin Clam Shells Used for Buttons2


 Some clam exerts are of the opinion that certain beds on the river should be protected by closed season laws.


The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Fisheries Steamer Plants Clam Spawn in Mississippi. Federal Experts Undertake the Work of Replenishing ‘Raw Material’ of Pearl Buttons. Game River Fish Necessary as Foster Parents of Microscopic Mussels.”; June 23, 1913; p. 7.

1https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/72/6d/1a/726d1a2d2168279af22cb2059807ddd8.jpg

2
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_oOIEPfltBFs/TRYq7zdOxHI/AAAAAAAALL4/9Nb_m3JZBQA/s1600/punched%2Bclam%2Bshell.jpg
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com


Thursday, June 22, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: June 22

June 22, 1905 – There was a commotion at the Hennepin County poor farm in Hopkins late this morning when Betsy Carlson “the sorceress” was seen entering the yard in charge of an officer.

The inmates knew that she had come back to stay and that they might throw away their rusty horseshoes and pocket buckeyes for rheumatism, for they would never work when Betsy was around. For more than two months, since Betsy escaped from the farm, the inmates have breathed in peace and now all their hopes of living to be 100 years old have been put in doubt.

Betsy was committed to the poor farm two years ago. Quietly but surely she convinced the other inmates that she possessed supernatural powers and that unless they toed the mark she would have ghosts cut capers in their rooms at night.

Many of them believed it and it was not long before Superintendent Colburn had his hands full. Old men who had stood their full height for 80 years came to him with stooped shoulders and said that the dried potatoes and buckeyes had failed to work and that their joints had finally stiffened with rheumatism. Others who had in some unknown way offended Betsy more seriously, swore they had pins stuck into them at night and had seen strange shapes on the white walls.

There was a general sigh of relief when Betsy ran away after saying that she was going into a larger field. For two months she kept out of sight, but last night she became bolder and tried her charms in South Minneapolis.

She was brought into police court today and put up a plucky fight for her freedom, and when she was ordered back to the farm she threatened to bring ruin to the place.

The county poor farm is a gloomy place today and Betsy has told the officers that she intends to keep it so.

The Minneapolis Journal; “’Betsy the Witch’ Back at Poorfarm. More Trouble Ahead for Superstitious Inmates.  When She was There Before She Convinced Her Associates That She Possessed Supernatural Powers and Really Made Life a Burden for them—Recaptured After Long Absence.”; June 23, 1905; p. 5.




Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain June 22, 2017,
as long as acknowledgement included.

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                    


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com






Wednesday, June 21, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: June 21

June 21, 1954 - Casey Jones, named after a real life railroad engineer, made his television debut on Channel 11 on this date in the Twin Cities.

http://www.pavekmuseum.org/casey.html

http://lunchwithcasey.com/main/?p=5




Photo Found at Minn. State Fair’s History and Heritage Center

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com





Tuesday, June 20, 2017

On this Date in Minnesota History: June 20

June 20, 1902 – A horrible head to head collision occurred at Lower Lake siding, two miles west of Staples, on the Northern Pacific railway at 1:45 this morning, between passenger train No. 7, going west, and No. 8, going east.

Engineer Walter Scott, Fireman George Rasmussen, Conductor John Noble, Baggageman Mohler and an unknown man, supposed to have been stealing a ride, were killed outright, and Engineer Ernest Schultz, Fireman W. H. Montgomery, Express Messengers Gibson and Heidrich and Harry Zerglar of Hammond, Ind., are badly injured.



Northern Pacific Depot, Staples, Minn.1


Train No. 7, with engine 227, in charge of Engineer Scott, took the siding for No. 8, which had the right of way. No. 8 was in charge of Conductor Noble and Engineer Schultz, with engine 228, and came down at a high rate of speed, believing everything was clear, but instead their train ran on the siding on which No. 7 was standing, resulting in one of the worst wrecks ever seen by the passengers, all of whom escaped serious injury, except Zergler, who was in the smoking car on train No. 8, which was partially telescoped and thrown clear of the tracks. He received internal injuries that are thought to be serious, and was taken to the Brainerd Hospital.

The killed and injured were under the wreck, and it was difficult to find them. Fire started at 3:30, but was kept under control by a volunteer bucket brigade, formed by passengers, until 4:35, when the task was given up. Engineer Scott’s body had not been recovered at a late hour.

Conductor Noble lived in St. Paul and leaves a widow and two small children. Engineer Scott lived in Staples, where he had a wife and two children. Fireman Rasmussen also resided in Staples and leaves a widow. Express Messenger Mohler was married and lived in St. Paul.

Two baggage cars, one express car and two coaches of train No. 8 were completely burned and two baggage and express and a passenger car on No. 7 were practically demolished. The two engines were total wrecks.

Railway Mail Clerk McBride, who was also injured, was taken to the Brainerd Hospital.


The Minneapolis Journal
; “Fatal Wreck on Nor. Pac. Two Passenger Trains Meet on Siding Near Staples This Morning. Five Trainmen killed, Two Employes (sic) and One Passenger Hurt.”; June 20, 1920; p. 1.

1https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/ff/17/c8/ff17c81aa5632f049f40f89d5cb2ddeb.jpg




http://www.greaterstaples.com/live/contact-us.html

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com





Monday, June 19, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: June 19

June 19, 1905 – C. H. Miles today received the first automobile that was ever in Bemidji, and the horseless vehicle is now at the Great Northern Depot.

Miles purchased the auto several months ago and has kept it at Hibbing, where he has large property interests. He decided, however, that the auto would be of more use to him in Bemidji than at the range town and shipped it to Bemidji with the result that it landed here safely today.

The Bemidji Daily Pioneer; “Miles Gets an Automobile. First Horseless Vehicle Owned by Bemidji Man Arrived Today.”; June 19, 1905; p. 3.




Bemidji Great Northern Depot
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Northern_Depot_(Bemidji,_Minnesota)#/media/File:Bemidji_Great_Northern_Depot.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com





Sunday, June 18, 2017

On this date in Minnesota History: June 18

June 18, 1936 – Larry “The Axe” Hennig, professional wrestler best known for his work in the American Wrestling Association, National Wrestling Alliance and World Wide Wrestling Federation, was born in Minneapolis on this date.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_Hennig




Larry “The Axe” Hennig

http://www.onlineworldofwrestling.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/06_Larry_HenningPWI-2.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com