Saturday, January 6, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: January 6

January 6, 1921 – The Duluth & Iron Range depot and lunch counter at Allen Junction was completely destroyed by fire of undetermined origin that originated in the basement of the building at 3 this morning. Although the building was equipped with water pipes for fire protection, the blaze spread so rapidly that the water was of no avail and soon the entire building was consumed. The building was practically new and one of the most modern depots on the road. The loss will probably run upwards of $6,000. Besides the loss of the building and office equipment to the railroad company, C. R. McQouwn, who operated the lunch counter, also suffered a heavy loss in equipment and household goods, as he lived in the second story of the building.

The company has installed a temporary building to be used for an office until the depot is rebuilt. Allen Junction is one of the principal terminals on the railroad, as it is the junction point between points on the main line and such places as Aurora, Biwabik, Eveleth and Virginia.

The Duluth Herald; “Allen Junction Depot, Lunch Counter Burns”; Jan. 7, 1921; p. 21.



Allen Junction
http://www.west2k.com/mnpix/allenjunction.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Friday, January 5, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: January 5

January 5, 20111Minnesota Twins pitcher Bert Blyleven was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame on this date. “Blyleven was drafted in the third round by the Minnesota Twins in 1969. He made his debut for the club on June 9, 1970 at the age of 19 and finished the season as the AL Rookie Pitcher of the Year. In 1973, he pitched 9 shut outs, more than any pitcher in the American League.”2 Blyleven played for the Minnesota Twins in half of his 22 seasons.1

1
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/06/sports/baseball/06hall.html?_r=2&scp=1&sq=bert%20blyleven&st=cse

2
http://www.mlbcenter.com/articles/2010-mlb/indians-update_010611.html



Bert Blyleven
http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/images/players/head_shot/111126.jpg
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website: 
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Thursday, January 4, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: January 4

January 4, 1906 – A letter believed to be from Pearl Wheaton, who was fatally wounded by Matt Styer, Tuesday, was discovered today and is receiving consideration in clearing up Caledonia’s recent murder mystery.

The letter is addressed to Styer ad in it the dead girl is represented as promising to elope with Styr and making arrangements to meet him at her home around midnight between Jan. 1 and Jan. 2, the hour the shooting occurred.

In view of this discovery the theory is advanced in behalf of Styer that he went to the Wheaton home to assist Pearl to escape, that he was discovered by members of the family and fired on and that he shot back in self-defense against the mother and sister, killing his sweetheart, Pearl, by accident, and that he killed himself when he realized what he had done.

The Wheaton family doubts the authenticity of the letter and clings to the original story that a triple murder and suicide was deliberately planned.

Thirty letters from Pearl Wheaton to Styer, all promising undying love, were found in Styer’s effects and among these were several in which the girl promised to go with Styer when he came after her.

Ruth Wheaton, Pearl’s sister, passed away today. Mrs. Wheaton may recover.

Pearl was formerly a school teacher in the country. Ruth was taking a nurse training at a St. Paul hospital.

The jury in the coroner’s inquest returned a verdict that Pearl Wheaton met her death at the hands of Mathias L. Styer.

The horse and rig that Styer expected to use in eloping with Pearl was found in a neighboring field.

The Minneapolis Tribune; “To Elope. Dead Wheaton Girl Had Promised Lover She Would Quit Her Parents. Letter Discovered Clears Up Mystery. Epistle Is Addressed to Styer and Is Signed By His Sweetheart.”; Jan. 5, 1906; p. 1.



http://www.davekunst1.com/Earthwalkers_Sign.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Wednesday, January 3, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: January 3

January 3, 1902 – Fifteen-year-old Emma Forcier, the only daughter of David Forcier, was killed in the Great Western Railway Yards near her home in St. Paul this afternoon. The girl, along with her brother and some other children, were in the yards picking up pieces of coal that were scattered around.

A long line of box cars was standing on a side track and the children were picking up the coal that was under them. Emma and her brother were under the cars when a switch engine coupled to the upper end of the line of cars started them in motion, Johnnie Forcier, the brother, got out from under the train without incident and tried to tell his sister to lie down and let the car pass. She either didn’t hear him or misunderstood what he said, and attempted to crawl out between the wheels. She put her hands on the outside of the rails when the wheels struck her and both hands were cut off. A brakebeam struck her and knocked her down, injuring her internally.




Children picking up coal in the railway yard1

As soon as the children who were present saw that the girl was under the wheels they ran to a brakeman, who signaled the engineer to stop the train. Had this not been done, the body of the child would have been ground to pieces beneath the wheels of the moving train. As it was, the wheels only passed over her arms.

When the train was stopped, a number of men who were present hurried to the girl and picked her up. She was still breathing, but died before she could be carried to her home, a few rods away.

Coroner Miller was called and investigated the case. He decided that an investigation was unnecessary, and ordered the remains taken to the county morgue. An autopsy was held over the remains this evening, which revealed the fact that four ribs were broken and that she was injured internally. It is thought that the brakebeam that struck her caused the injuries of which she died.

David Forcier, her father, is employed as a section hand on the Great Western, and was at work in the yards not far from the scene of the accident.

The Saint Paul Globe; “Little Girl Killed. Emma Forcier Is Run Over in Great Western Yards. She was Picking Up Coal. With Her Brother She Crept Under a Line of Cars—Killed When the Engine Started the Train.”; Jan. 4, 1902; p. 2.

1http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-IYSWoXYZ27w/UsyvfGrpo2I/AAAAAAAAEk4/mlUvMTlhkzk/s1600/coal+boys.jpg





http://users.frii.com/gbooth/Trains/GreatWestern/Introduction/GWRLogo.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Tuesday, January 2, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: January 2

January 2, 1916 – Dr. M. A. Hatch, who already has five indictments for alleged illegal practice on women patients, one of them charging him with the manslaughter of 18-yer-old Helen Davis on Dec. 8, was re-arrested today. He was at liberty on $10,000 bail.

Tomorrow County Attorney John Rees will issue a new complaint, charging Dr. Hatch with manslaughter in the first degree in connection with the death today of Mrs. Bertha Gruenberg, 36 years old. She was the mother of six children.  Dr. Hatch s accused of performing an illegal operation on her at her home Christmas day. She died at Ashbury Hospital. Coroner Seashore, after an autopsy, said death was due to septic poisoning following a criminal operation.

Dr. Hatch was to have been called to trial in district court tomorrow on the charge of manslaughter for the death of Helen Davis. He pleaded not guilty to this charge Dec. 12.

His first arrest took place Nov. 30 in a raid on his residence on Minnehaha Ave., in which five women were taken, all of whom are said to have been subject to illegal operations. One of these women was Helen Davis, whose death occurred at the City Hospital.

Walter Newton and Nathan Rivkin, assistant county attorneys, investigated the Gruenberg case today, and say they obtained, through witnesses, the substance of an oral statement from the dying woman establishing their case against Dr. Hatch.

The assistant county attorneys say they learned Mrs. Gruenberg became seriously ill last Thursday, and that another physician, Dr. George J. Gordon, was called in. They say Dr. Gordon ran into Dr. Hatch at the woman’s residence Friday morning as preparations were made to take Mrs. Gruenberg to the hospital.

Dr. Hatch is said to have experienced surprise and indignation that another physician had been called but withdrew. The patient continued to grow worse and at 7 a.m. today Dr. Gordon called Mr. Rivkin to her bedside to take what he believed to be her dying statement.

Death came before the assistant county attorney could reach the hospital, but the woman told her story to nurses, hospital authorities, Dr. Gordon and others who were called into the room to hear it.


1


It wasn’t until after an autopsy had been performed that the representatives of the county attorney asked the police to act. Detectives William Fox, John Staples and Michael Johannes went to Dr. Hatch’s home but found he wasn’t there.

Watching the telephone so that no warning might be sent from the home, the detectives searched the dwelling. Dr. Hatch arrived an hour later and was placed under arrest. He was held without bail and without a charge, pending the issuance of a formal complaint tomorrow.
“We believed $10,000 bail in the former case was sufficient,” said Assistant County Attorney Walter Newton. “Now we will ask the court to make the bail so high that Dr. Hatch will be unable to furnish it.”

The new charge will delay trial in the former ones. A new grand jury meets in two days. Evidence obtained today will be placed before it immediately. It is probable the county attorney will elect to try the physician on the new case, abandoning the former charges for the present.

Asked for a statement this evening, Dr. Hatch replied that he had none to make. His attorney, George B. Leonard, was expected to ask a continuance of several days in the hearing of the former charge when the case was called and it was to have been granted.

The assistant county attorneys said the husband Moses Gruenberg, will be questioned. Three of the children were questioned and are said to have admitted knowledge of an operation, but denied knowledge of its nature.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Hatch Arrested After Another Woman’s Death. New Manslaughter Charge to Be Placed Against Physician Today. Patient Underwent Operation Christmas. Latest Development to Delay Trial of Former Cases—Held Without Bond.”; Jan. 3, 1916; p. 1.

1http://abortionmedicalethics.weebly.com/uploads/1/6/9/9/16997034/295188.jpg?407

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Monday, January 1, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: January 1

January 1, 1918 – August Maninen and Ernest Palmi were arrested this evening by Hibbing police. They are sought by the Houghton, Mich., authorities with being slackers and not appearing for the draft calls.

The men had registration cards, but failed to appear when their respective boards ordered them to do so.

The Duluth Herald; “Houghton Slackers Arrested in Hibbing”; Jan. 2, 1918; p. 7.



Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain Feb. 7, 2015,
as long as acknowledgement included.
 

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Sunday, December 31, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 31

December 31, 1979 - Colonial Hall and Masonic Lodge No. 30 consists of two historic buildings owned by Anoka (Minn.) Lodge No 30 AF & AM, which was chartered on October 25, 1859. Colonial Hall is a two-story wooden building built in 1904 for Drs. Alanson and Flora Aldrich. Its architect was Frederick Marsh who lived in Champlin. It was purchased by Anoka Lodge in 1921.

In 1922, construction began on the present two story redbrick Masonic temple, which is located behind but to the north of the Colonial Hall. Designed by Frederick Marsh, it was completed and occupied in 1923. Colonial Hall and Masonic Lodge No. 30 were added to the National Register of Historic Places on this date. Anoka Lodge No. 30 still meets in the lodge hall. Colonial Hall is now occupied by a tenant, the Anoka Artique.

http://nrhp.mnhs.org/NRDetails.cfm?NPSNum=79001182

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonial_Hall_and_Masonic_Lodge_No._30






 Colonial Hall and Masonic Lodge No. 30, Anoka, Minn.
Photos taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain Dec. 31, 2017, 
as long as acknowledgement included.  

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com