Thursday, February 22, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: February 22

February 22, 1929Actor James Hong was born on this date in Minneapolis, Minn.

He has worked in numerous productions in American media since the 1950s, playing a variety of Asian roles, including Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese. He is known for his roles in various Hollywood films, such as Hannibal Chew in Blade Runner (1982), David Lo Pan in Big Trouble in Little China (1986), Jeff Wong in Wayne's World 2 (1993), and Chi-Fu in Mulan (1998). Hong is also known for playing Daolon Wong on the television series Jackie Chan Adventures and Mr. Ping in the Kung Fu Panda franchise.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Hong




http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/scoobydoo/images/6/61/James_hong.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20110531225613

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Wednesday, February 21, 2018

On this Date in Minnesota History: February 21

February 21, 1919 - Lyman W. Ayer, Little Falls, Minn., said to be the first white child born in Minn., and an expert timber cruiser for 60+ years, gave advice to the state forestry board at a meeting late today in St. Paul to discuss forestry bills pending in the legislature.

Ayer was born on June 10, 1832 at Pokegama Mission in what is now Pine County. His father was a missionary to the Chippewa Indians, his mother a teacher. Ayer says he spoke better Chippewa than English, and acquired a taste for such Indian delicacies as beaver tail, Moose nose, buffalo hump and bear paws.


Lyman W. Ayer1

For 62 years Ayer cruised timber and has been a land-looker in the dense forests of Northern Minnesota and Canada; his judgments are said to have resulted in the purchase of millions of dollars’ worth of standing trees. Practically all of the territory between St. Louis and the Arctic Circle has been covered by the cruiser on foot and by dog team, in the days when no better transportation was available.

Ayer served as a member of the Second Minnesota battery of artillery during the Civil War from Feb. 1862 to Aug. 1865.


He is still active and his eyesight and hearing are good.

The Duluth Herald; “First Gopher White Child Gives Advice”; Feb. 22, 1919; p. 16.

1The Saint Pau Globe; “First White Male Born in Minnesota. Lyman W. Ayer, Veteran Timber Cruiser Enjoys This Distinction.”; March 27, 1904; p. 13.

Little Falls Herald
; “In the Early Days L. W. Ayer Tells of Visit to Minneapolis 70 Years Ago.”; Dec. 12, 1919; p. 3.


               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Tuesday, February 20, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: February 20

February 20, 1855 – Named for explorer and author, John Carver, Carver County, Minn., was established on this date.

Upham, Warren; Minnesota Geographic Names, Their Origin and Historic Significance; Minnesota Historical Society (St. Paul, Minn., 1969); p. 80.



John Carver

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Carver#/media/File:Jonathan_Carver.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


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Monday, February 19, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: February 19

February 19, 1910 – One million, six hundred and fifty thousand dollars were drawn through the busy streets of Minneapolis late this afternoon when the Minnesota Loan and Trust Company privately moved the last of its valuables from its old quarters, 311 Nicollet Ave., to the new location, corner of First Ave. S. and Fourth St.

S. S. Cook, cashier of the company, believing that the less ostentatious the move the better, assigned the move to a few plain clothes men and officers of the bank, placed the cash, bonds and securities in ordinary pine boxes and soon had the entire fortune safely within the vaults of the new bank. There was no mishap nor unusual occurrence.

Cook acknowledged that this transfer did not give him the anxiety that the safe deposit boxes moved on Lincoln’s birthday had given him. The safety deposit boxes were escorted by a heavy guard of police. The bank will open its doors Monday morning and the work of the institution will carry on without the loss of an hour.

Minneapolis Sunday Tribune; “Million in Treasure Toted in Pine Boxes. Minnesota Loan & Trust Company Secretly Transports Cash and Securities. Public Not Advised of the Removal to Institution’s New Quarters.”; February 20, 1910; p. 10.



Nicollet Ave. Location of Minnesota Loan and Trust Company

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/108086459779773498/?lp=true

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Sunday, February 18, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: February 18

February 18, 1915 – Frank Uksisich, for the past two years employed as a laborer at the Norman Mine near Virginia, Minn., was found dead about 3 this afternoon on the railroad track leading to the Prindle open pit mine, with a bullet hole through his heart and a second through his neck at the base of the larynx. Near his body was found a 22-calibre revolver, with two empty chambers, clearly indicating that he had died by his own hand.

The body was found by engineers in the employ of the Oliver Iron Mining Company, who were making a trip to the mine. Coroner Crowe viewed it and decided that an inquest was unnecessary. It was removed to the Gillespie undertaking parlors this evening to be prepared for burial.

Uksisich was 30 years old and unmarried. His only known relative has yet to be located. Uksisich had been despondent for some time over ill health. His friends believe that brooding over his physical condition led him to commit suicide.

The Virginia Enterprise; “Mine Laborer Took Life; Ill Despondent. Fired Bullet Through Heart from Small Calibre Revolver Sometime During Yesterday.”; Feb. 19, 1915; p. 1.


Norman Mine, Virginia, Minn.

http://www.mindat.org/photo-377175.html
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Saturday, February 17, 2018

On this Date in Minnesota History: February 17

February 17, 1907 – Warren G. Stearns, one of more than one hundred Macalester College, St. Paul, students who have fallen victim to an epidemic of ptomaine poisoning, is dying at St. Joseph’s Hospital. His parents were summoned to his bedside today. The young man, who has been under the care of Dr. F. E. Balcome, has been in critical condition since he was admitted to St. Joseph’s Hospital and the physician says that other complications set in that retarded his recovery. At the hospital it was thought that he would not live through the night.


St. Joseph’s Hospital 19111

Mr. Stearns is 23 years old and from Jasper, Minn.

Twenty students of Macalester College were taken ill the evening of Feb. 11 following dinner at the Eutrophian Club, and the doctor who was called pronounced it due to ptomaine poisoning.

     “The Eutrophian Hall is a men’s boarding club, situated two blocks north
     of the college building. Its dining room is light, cheery and commodious,
     having a seating capacity for about forty young men. The club is under
     the care of a competent matron, and a steward, who is elected from the
     members. The amount paid for board by members defrays all expenses.
     It is the aim of those in whose hands the management is entrusted to
     keep the expenses at a minimum. Board ranges from two dollars and
     forty cents to two dollars and seventy cents a week.”
          -- Catalogue of Macalester College and Classical Academy 1906-
              1907, St. Paul, Minn.
2


At first, the poisoning was confined to members of the Eutrophian Club; however, the number of victims continued to grow. The condition of things at the state farm school, where a hundred or more are sick with ptomaine poisoning, was said to be improved today. Only 12 new cases were reported, while 30 had been reported yesterday. There were only 50 confined to bed in the school today and none of them was reported to be in a critical condition.

Evan Evans, another student and member of the Eutrophian Club, whose home is in Le Sueur, is also suffering from poison of some kind, but is able to get around. None of the other members is seriously ill, although several have complained of feeling out of sorts.
Members of the club and the college authorities are at a loss to account for the poisoning, which appears to be ptomaine. The provisions were purchased from downtown stores.
_____________________

Stearns died the morning of Feb. 19. Milk was the primary suspect of the poisoning. Samples were sent to the state chemical laboratory for examination; however, nothing was found in the milk to indicate the presence of any poison.  Stearns was the only victim to die; all others recovered. It is now believed that the food that they had eaten was the cause of the epidemic.


The Minneapolis Tribune; “A Student Is Dying. Victim of Ptomaine Poisoning at Macalester College Near Death’s Door—Others Recovering.”; Feb. 18, 1907; p. 5.

The Bemidji Daily Pioneer; “Poison Mystery at College. Several Macalester (Minn.) Students Seriously Ill.”; Feb. 13, 1907; p. 4.

Star Tribune; “Students Poisoned.”; Minneapolis, Minn.; Feb. 12, 1907; p. 6.

Duluth Evening Herald; “Death of Student at Macalester College May be Due to Ptomaine Poisoning. Others Were Taken Sick But All Recovered But Stearns.”; Feb. 19, 1907; p. 1.

1http://www.lakesnwoods.com/images/StPaul64.jpg

2https://www.macalester.edu/library/oldcatalogs/cat_1906_1907.pdf

Definition of ptomaine poisoning:
https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/ptomaine
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


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Friday, February 16, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: February 16

February 16, 1915 – The George Tileston Flour Mills, St. Cloud, now owned and operated by the Great Northern Flour Mills Company, burned to the ground this afternoon. The loss, which is total, is estimated at between $125,000 and $150,000. The blaze originated, it is believed, from a hot box in the upper story and spread quickly to the rest of the structure. The Tileston Mills were built 26 years ago. Several carloads of wheat stored in the mill itself are included in the loss.

It is not known as yet whether the mill will be rebuilt, though present contracts for flour, it was announced this evening, would be fulfilled. The mills were the largest west of Minneapolis, having a capacity of 1,200 barrels. Local firemen had narrow escapes when two walls fell out, burying their hose.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “$150,000 Fire at St. Cloud. Tileston Flour Mills, Largest West of Minneapolis, Are a Total Loss.”; Feb. 17, 1915; p. 2.


George Tileston Flour Mills, St. Cloud

http://www.lakesnwoods.com/images/StClou186.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Thursday, February 15, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: February 15

February 15, 1912 (Friday) - Fourteen young women clerks and stenographers employed in the offices of the P. V. Collins Publishing Company, Minneapolis, resigned and went home today rather than comply with an order of Mr. Collins that they reduce the height of their shoe heels to one inch by Monday. They regarded the order as an infringement on personal liberty, as an attempt to dictate office style, to start a new fashion of office footwear, and they resented it.



Shoe Ad1 


Young women in restaurants wear uniforms, saleswomen in department stores wear black waists or black dresses and nurses are proud of their hospital uniforms. But those are entirely different cases. The young women of the P. V. Collins Publishing Company apparently never thought that their jobs might be contingent on conforming to a certain little matter of dress detail, and that detail the heel of the shoe, which is not supposed to be seen, unless in such weather as this, or studded with diamonds.

But Monday one of the girls, Miss Rose Burkhart, had fallen down the back stairs of the office and hurt her hip, and Mr. Collins told the girls that the accident was the result of the high-heeled shoes the victim wore. The bulletin to reduce the heels, either by altering their old shoes or by buying new ones, was the result, and Mr. Collins is said to have emphasized his ideas in a lecture today at noon.

Meantime, the girls had gone home last night to talk the case over with their mothers. Many of them had arrived at the conclusion that it would be a shame to spoil good shoes merely to conform to the order of an office manager, as their heels were the height of fashion.



1912 Shoe Ad2

William F. Tankerly, a department manager, helped the girls this morning to draw up a petition, requesting Mr. Collins to recede from his stand, or to modify his order. The petition was signed by 35 girls in the mailing department; 15 did not sign.

The petition reached Mr. Collins desk and the noon lecture resulted. The girls were given to understand that their choice was between their jobs and their heels. Twelve of the auditors left their jobs and took their heels at once, and two others followed later. Others are expected to follow unless the feminine right to wear as uncomfortable shoes as she pleases is recognized.

“Stenographers are not going to be dictated to in all matters,” said one of the girls who left today. “We don’t have to dress to suit a manager, and any shoe dealer will tell you that all shoes are being manufactured with high-heels, and that it spoils the shape o the shoe and hurts the foot to cut down the heel. Most of the girls that are working could not afford to have their shoes spoiled. Mr. Collins’ action was arbitrary, and should be resented. So there!”

“During the past four years, three of our girls have fallen down on account of high heels,” said Mr. Collins this evening. “I became tired of carrying the responsibility and I notified them that they would have to keep their heels within an inch. I told them that if their brains were in their heels they couldn’t work for me. I called up several shoe houses and found out that they sold common sense heels as well as high ones. Heels two or three inches high may be all right on a dance floor, but not to business. Tight skirts and peak-a-boo waists are just as bad.”


The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Office Girls Walk Out Rather than Cut Heels. Strike at P. V. Collins Publishing Company’s Office Follow Manager’s Shoe Order. Footwear Ruling Results from Young Woman’s Fall Down Back Stairs.”; Feb. 16, 1912; p. 2.

1The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; Feb. 15, 1912; p. 10.

2The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; Feb. 17, 1912; p. 19.

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Wednesday, February 14, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: February 14

February 14, 1907 – A daring and unique jail delivery took place in Owatonna late this afternoon, when William Radke, under arrest for burglary, broke out of the Steele County jail and made good his escape.


Steele County Courthouse 19091


Radke was confined in a cell usually, but was given the freedom of the corridor. In the corridor Radke secured possession of a mop handle that stood there. On the end of this he tied a board and to the end of the board he fastened a nail that he had bent into a sort of hook. Reaching over the grating of the corridor, he succeeded in catching the hook in the keyhole of the drawer in the desk in which the keys are kept. After succeeding in this, he drew the drawer and hook back and again angled until he was able to get the keys on the hook and, having secured possession of these, he opened the doors and calmly walked out of the jail.

His escape was discovered and a posse of men was sent out to recapture him, but up to a late hour this evening, Radke wa still at large, although it is believed he is hiding somewhere within the city limits.

Radke had broken into the depot at Medford Village, just south of Owatonna, while the agent was at dinner, and looted the till in broad daylight.

He was captured in Owatonna and appeared to be exceedingly harmless and a well-behaved prisoner.

Telegrams were sent all over the state notifying the police to be on the alert.

The Minneapolis Tribune; “Prisoner Escapes From Owatonna Jail. Gains Freedom by Means of Mop Handle. Ties Board with Crooked Nail to End of Stick. Angles for Prison Keys with Improvised Fish Pole and Rewarded by Success.”; Feb. 15, 1907; p. 3.

1http://www.lakesnwoods.com/images/Owaton17.jpg
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Tuesday, February 13, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: February 13

Feb. 13, 1905 - John B. LaBree, a pioneer of Crookston and founder of Thief River Falls, died in Crookston at noon today at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Nat Campbell. The LaBrees were pioneers of Minnesota, his father John B. LaBree, Sr., having taken a homestead 52 years ago, which now comprises a portion of the city of St. Paul. John B., Jr., resided in St. Paul for many years and later moved to Crookston, where he was the first city marshal under Capt. E. C. Davis’ administration when Davis was the first mayor of Crookston.

LaBree became interested in real estate and built several residences, residing himself in the home that is now owned and occupied by Judge R. J. Montague, which is near the beautiful home of his daughter. In 1881 LaBree moved his family from Crookston and took up residence on a homestead where Thief River Falls is now located, and started a hotel there, which was the nucleus of the present city, nearly all of which is located on land included at that time in the LaBree homestead. Mr. and Mrs. LaBree reared a family of 12 children, who grew to manhood and womanhood in Polk and Red Lake Counties. Mrs. LaBree died in 1896. All their children are still alive.

The Saint Paul Globe; Feb. 14, 1905; p. 5.

The Thief River Falls News; “Death of a Pioneer. John B. LaBree Died Monday Noon in Crookston.”; Feb. 16, 1905; p. 1.



http://www.lakesnwoods.com/images/Crooks37.jpg




http://thiefriverfallsmn.govoffice3.com/vertical/Sites/%7BF0A915C0-82C2-43FC-93FF-B561AD75910F%7D/uploads/sign.jpg
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         



Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


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Monday, February 12, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: February 12

February 12, 1908 – Commander Bon Ward of Camp No. 8, Sons of Veterans announced at the special Lincoln Day exercise held in Memorial Hall this evening that Local Grand Army posts and allied orders will ask Thomas Lowry to give the Lincoln funeral car, now located in Columbia Heights, a more central location. Lowry is the owner of the car.



President Lincoln’s Funeral Car (National Park Service Photo)1


 The car was purchased by Lowry several years ago out of patriotic spirit and brought to Minneapolis as a cherished relic of the great president. Its present location is too far out to make it readily accessible by the great mass of the people, and Lowry will be asked to give his permission to have it placed in one of the city parks, and to that end the park commissioners will be asked to sanction the site to be selected.

Over 400 veterans, sons of veterans, their families and friends attended the exercises. The address of the evening was delivered by Dr. J. S. Montgomery on the story of Lincoln’s greatness, and the speaker emphasized the sincerity and genuineness that characterized the president in all his motives and actions. Several musical numbers and a recitation filled out the program.

Unfortunately, the funeral car never left Columbia Heights and ended up burning in a prairie fire: http://pjefamilyresearch.blogspot.com/2015/03/on-this-date-in-minnesota-history-march_18.html

The Minneapolis Tribune; “Grand Army members Honor Lincoln’s Memory. Allied Orders Hold Meeting in Courthouse—Dr. Montgomery Speaks.”; Feb. 13, 1908; p. 6.


1http://rogerjnorton.com/Lincoln51.html
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Sunday, February 11, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: February 11

February 11, 1914 – A fire early today destroyed the Indian school at Nett Lake on the Bois Forte Indian Reservation. The school was recently completed at a cost of $4,600.


Minnesota Native American Reservation Map1

The fire means that the 73 children who have been attending the school will have no chance to go to school until other arrangements can be made.

The origin of the fire is a mystery. According to Albert B. Reagan, Indian agent, there was no heat in the place after 10 last night. His theory is that tramps may have taken shelter there or that the fire was purely of incendiary origin.

The Duluth Herald; “Indians’ New School Burns. Recently Completed Structure at Nett Lake Is Destroyed.”; Feb. 12, 1914; p. 13.

1https://www.bloomington.k12.mn.us/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/content_images/Screen%20Shot%202016-09-29%20at%2010.41.29%20AM.png?itok=GlQ61xKb




https://kbft.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/2004127.png

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Saturday, February 10, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: February 10

February 10, 1911 – Charles Stolberg, for 12 years register of deeds of Carlton County, shot and killed himself this evening about half a mile from Carlton, presumably while suffering from the effects of a severe attack of grip*. So far as known his office and family affairs furnish no cause for the act. He left this afternoon for a walk to Scanlon, he said, intending to return later on the train. His failure to return resulted in a searching party tracking him about half a mile north of town, where he was found lying dead in the snow with a bullet hole in his head. A new revolver near the body indicated the manner of death. The body was taken to Cloquet, where Coroner Nydquist will conduct an inquest.

It was about 4 this afternoon when Stolberg left the courthouse after remarking to a friend that he believed he would walk to Scanlon, a distance of about three miles, and return on the evening train in the hope the walk in the fresh air would prove beneficial for a severe attack of the grip*, with which he had been wrestling a good part of the winter. Nothing was thought of his action, as he appeared to be in a rational mood, until about 10 p.m., when Mrs. Stolberg became alarmed at his failure to return and notified friends of the family.



1


James B. Gillespie and John B. Thompson, who had been requested by Mrs. Stolberg to search for her husband, learned from Scanlon that he had not boarded the train there nor been seen in that vicinity and they started on foot for Scanlon in about the direction he would take.

About half a mile north of Carlton they followed very fresh tracks in the snow, then came across some blood and finally the body, indicating Stolberg had walked a few feet after firing the bullet into his head. A small piece of rope or string hanging to a tree and marks in the snow indicated Stolberg had first tried to hang himself, but the rope was too small and he then used the pistol. He had been dead some time when the body was found. The pistol used was new and he evidently bought it for the purpose.

The news of the tragic fate of Mr. Stolberg created a sensation and came as a great shock to the community, as he was very popular, having been elected register of deeds several successive times without little or no opposition. He was a native of Hester, Sweden, aged 46, and had lived in this country many years. He is survived by his widow and one daughter, age 12.

The Duluth Herald; Register of Deeds of Carlton County Ends His Life By Shooting. Charles Stolberg Commits Suicide While Walking to Scanlon. Indications Show He First Attempted to Hang Himself. Deceased a Well-Known and Popular Resident of Carlton.”; Feb. 11, 1911; pp. 1 & 3.


*Definition of grip: https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/The+grip

1https://24timezones.com/staticmap/?center=46.7216,-92.4594&zoom=10&size=350x200&maptype=roadmap&language=en





Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain Aug. 24, 2013,
as long as acknowledgement included.


               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com