Monday, December 10, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 10


December 10, 1905 – Minnehaha Falls celebrated the semi-centennial of its immortalization today, but despite the significance of the occasion, a transient visitor to Minneapolis was the only person of the thousands in the Twin Cities to journey to congratulate the Laughing Water on the completion of its first half century of underlying fame.

The fact that Minnehaha was forced to celebrate its anniversary in solitude was most likely due to the fact that few residents of Minneapolis knew that it was just 50 years ago today that Longfellow, the poet, first gave his “Hiawatha” to the world.



Henry Wadsworth Longfellow1

A mere chance put Charles M. Simmons, a Chicago traveling man who stopped over Sunday at the West Hotel, in possession of the information this afternoon, promptly making the trip to the falls for the express purpose of being able to say that he viewed them on “Hiawatha’s” fiftieth anniversary.

It was on Dec. 10, 1855, that “Hiawatha” was published, and from the moment of its first appearance, Minnehaha Falls has been intimately associated with the poem. Hundreds of admirers of Longfellow have journeyed to Minneapolis for no other reason than to view the Falls of Laughing Water and peruse their well-worn editions of Longfellow under the shadow of the falls.



“The Song of Hiawatha”2


Simmons, the only visitor to this historical spot today, was greatly surprised upon reaching the falls to find that he was the only person there. According to him, the reputation of Minneapolis as a literary center is sure to suffer if it becomes generally known that such a significant anniversary as the one happening today went by with no apparent notice on the part of the literary public of the city.


“Yes, I believe that I hold the distinction of being the only person who visited Minnehaha Falls [today], although it was the most important date in the history of the spot. Judging from the appearance of the snow in the vicinity of the falls, no one has been within hearing distance of the waterfall for some time. In fact I experienced some difficulty in finding the way, owing to the absence of a beaten path through the snow.

“It was by the merest chance that I learned that this was the fiftieth anniversary of the appearance of Longfellow’s “Hiawatha.” I was looking at a stack of old books in one of your book stores Saturday, and while there I ran across a copy of a ‘Life of Longfellow,’  about the first thing I read was that the poem ‘Hiawatha’ was first published on December 10, 1855. Something about the date struck me as peculiar, and a moment later it dawned on me that the poem is 50 years old today. I formed an instant resolution to see what Minnehaha looks like in the winter time and incidentally to be able to tell my friends that I was there on the fiftieth anniversary of the event that made the falls immortal.”



Minnehaha Falls in the winter of 19063


 According to Simmons, Minnehaha is not likely to celebrate another semi-centennial unless immediate steps are taken to preserve the falls from being gradually eaten away. It is the Chicago man’s opinion that unless a retaining wall is built along the crest of the falls, there will soon be no falls to look at.


“Yesterday was not the first time that I ever saw Minnehaha Falls. Do not go off with that impression in your head. I saw the falls fully 20 years ago, but it happens that I never saw them in the winter time before today.


“The principal thing that struck me today in looking at them is the change that is apparent in their looks. There was a time not so long ago, when there was a big shelf behind the falls proper—so large, in fact,  that 20 or 30 persons could get behind the falling water without any difficulty. Now the shelf over which the water runs is so worn down and disintegrated that there is little space behind the falls, and, more than that, the rocky shelf itself is in danger of giving away entirely unless something is done to brace it up.

“A few thousand dollars spent in some such way as I have indicated would serve to keep your most famous landmark for the enjoyment of succeeding generations. On the other hand, the failure to do anything to preserve the falls will mean that in a few years Minnehaha Falls will be nothing more than a series of broken rapids with little of beauty about them and nothing at all of historic association.”

The Minneapolis Tribune; “Hiawatha. Semi-Centennial of Longfellow’s Famous Poem Is Celebrated Yesterday By Lone Traveler. Stranger in the City Finds Falls Deserted. Declares ‘Laughing Water’ Will Soon Be a Memory Unless a Retaining Wall Is Built.”; December 11, 1905; p. 1.

1https://www.biography.com/people/henry-wadsworth-longfellow-9385673

2https://www.abebooks.com/first-edition/SONG-HIAWATHA-PLAYERS-EDITION-Introduction-Frank/10753731328/bd#&gid=1&pid=1

3http://www.lakesnwoods.com/images/1900s.10.jpg

_____________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Sunday, December 9, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 9

December 9, 1904 – The little village of Thomson, two miles from Carlton, was struck by fire this morning, destroying three buildings, valued at about $5,000.

All of the buildings destroyed were vacant at the time of the fire. One was formerly occupied as a hotel and saloon combined. The second was the old post office building, and the third another saloon.

All of the buildings were frame and burned rapidly. The Carlton fire department was notified and succeeded in reaching the spot in time to save two residences adjoining the blazing buildings.

H. H. Hawkins, of Duluth, was the owner of the building formerly occupied by the saloon, and the Cloquet Lumber Company and F. L. Redfield owned the old hotel building.

There was no insurance on any of the property and the value of the structures, estimated at $5,000, will be a dead loss. The origin of the fire is unknown.


Duluth Evening Herald; “Buildings at Thomson Burned”; December 9, 1904; p. 1.



https://www.bestplaces.net/images/city/2764750_mn_thomson.png

           __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Saturday, December 8, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 8

December 8, 19781The Jackson Hotel in Anoka, Minn., now Billy’s Bar & Grill, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on this date. It was “built in 1884 after a fire destroyed much of downtown Anoka. [The hotel] was in operation from 1884 through 1875 and played a central role in Anoka's commerce. [It] was located at the hub of water, rail, and overland trade routes, and served a variety of travelers. [The hotel] first served farmers and loggers who brought their goods to Anoka for sale. Later, it served traveling businessmen, politicians, photographers, lecturers, entertainers, and tourists. Traveling salesmen also used the hotel's sample room as a showroom and office. It had a reputation as the leading hotel in Anoka and one of the best hotels in Minnesota.”2


Billy’s Bar & Grill


“On August 16, 1884 a horrible fire swept through Anoka. A total of 86 buildings were destroyed by the fire. On August 22, 1885, just barely past the first anniversary of the fire, the hotel became the scene of Anoka's first murder. A drunken disagreement between friends turned deadly as W.F. Mirick (or possibly Mieriet) opened fire on his pal Peter Gross (a German immigrant) with a revolver. Only one of the shots fired struck Gross. It hit him in the back as he attempted to flee from the gunman.

Mirick ran from the scene of his crime and the mortally wounded Gross managed to drag himself into the hotel. He was taken to a room upstairs and put under the care of a doctor, but died the following night. The killer was eventually caught and convicted for his crime.”3

The building is thought to be haunted. A “spectral woman with red hair is said to appear in a third floor window.”3   

1
http://nrhp.mnhs.org/NRDetails.cfm?NPSNum=78001525

2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackson_Hotel_(Anoka,_Minnesota)

3
http://www.thecabinet.com/darkdestinations/location.php?sub_id=dark_destinations&letter=b&location_id=billys_bar_and_grill_anoka_mn

Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain 12-8-2012, as long as acknowledgement included.  
           __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Friday, December 7, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 7

December 7, 1941 - This is a photo of the USS Ward gun crew #3 sometime after the "First Shot" at the Japanese submarine on 7 December 1941.


http://home.earthlink.net/~larrydev/USSWardpage.html



The Ward's gun can be found on the Minnesota Capitol grounds.

Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain Dec. 7, 2012,
as long as acknowledgement included.



Dedicated to the following men of the 47th Division, 11th Battalion, 9th Naval District U.S. Naval Reserve, St. Paul, Minnesota, ordered to active duty January 21, 1941. These men all served on board the destroyer U.S.S. Ward, DD 139, which fired the first shot of World War II, at Pearl Harbor by sinking a Japanese midget submarine on December 7, 1941, at 6:45 a.m.





Lieutenant H.F. Doughty
Ensign D.B. Hainie

Anderson, C.F. S2C
Ball, R.L. S2C
Barfuss, C.A. S2C
Bukrey, E.J. S2C
Campion, W.A. S2C
Christopherson, G.H. F1C
Collyard, H.V. S2C
Conroy, W.E. Com
Cyrus, J.H. MATT2C
Derosia, G.H. CWT
Dionisopoulos, P.A. S2C
Dolan, G.C. S2C
Domagall, A.A. S2C
Byrda, J.P. S1C
Ekblad, K.W. MM1C
Entenmann, J.R. F3C
Ethier, O.S. F3C
Fenton, C.W. S2C
Fink, H.J. S2C
Flanagan, H.P. S2C
Fluegel, J.V. S1C
Fratto, F.L. F1C
Gearia, H.F. S1C
Gerner, L.O. CM3C
Gibson, E.T. CY
Gill, J.C. S2C
Gorman, R.H. S2C
Griep, W.C. S2C
Grindall, B.J. S2C
Grueing, D.W. S2C
Haes, D.D. RM3C
Haiberger, G.G. S2C
Hajdu, F.M. S2C
Harris, H.J. F1C
Howat, A.J. F1C
Hueffmeier, G.W. S2C
Hughes, F.V. S2C
Hultman, G.R. S2C
Hurley, M.J. F3C
Jones, D.B. S2C
Kinderman, B.J. F1C
Knapp, R.H. BM2C
Kramolisce, J.W. F3C
Lasch, K.C.J. COX
Leclair, G.J. S2C
Lehner, W.S. F3C
Linn, P.A. WTIC
Lombardi, D.J. S2C
Mayer, W.L. CGM
Merthan, J.R. F3C
Mondo, G.J. GM3C
Morgan, D.J. WTIC
Mrozak, E.A. S2C
Nadeau, T.C. F3C
Nelson, H.H. WT2C
Nolde, R.B. S2C
Norlander, F.C. F3C
Paynter, H.K. F1C
Peick, J.A. S2C
Pepin, D.R.C. S2C
Peterson, J.E. S1C
Pfaff, K.L. S2C
Phenning, F.P. F3C
Probst, P.W. SC1C
Raeubig, H.E. S2C
Reetz, R.A. F3C
Richardson, R.E. S2C
Sanford, A.C. S2C
Schmitt, C.E. S2C
Scholtes, W.A. S2C
Seydel, R.J. F3C
Southward, H. S2C
Spratt, J.L. F3C
Stein, R.E. S2C
Swedberg, K.C. F1C
Thill, R.J. S2C
Throne, J.F. S2C
Trimmer, J.P. RM3C
Wells, H.O. S2C
Wood, R.W. S2C
Zechmann, E.A. F3C
Zechmann, R.A. F3C
           __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Thursday, December 6, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 6

December 6, 1907 – Frederick “Fritz” Caseheimer, 69 years old and a retired farmer in Delano, Wright County, Minn., died suddenly this morning. Dr. Lares was called after he had expired, and the physician expressed the belief that the death was due to poisoning. Coroner Moffett and County Attorney Woolley will conduct the examination tomorrow morning.

Caseheimer had eaten breakfast at the usual hour and went outside to do his morning chores. In a short time he returned to the house and complained of having cramps. He was given hot water, but this failed to ease the pain and in a short time he was dead. Caseheimer was well-to-do and highly esteemed in his neighborhood. His wife, three boys and a married daughter survive him.

The Minneapolis Tribune; “Farmer is poisoned. Fritz Caseheimer, of Delano, Dies Suddenly at His Home.”; Dec. 7, 1907; p. 3.


Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain 6-23-2013, 
as long as acknowledgement included.
___________________________

Mrs. Theresa Caseheimer, an aged woman of Buffalo, charged with the murder of her husband by poisoning, is being tried at that town. The stomach of Frederick Caseheimer was removed and taken to Minneapolis for examination by experts. Traces of poison were found. The state also showed at the preliminary examination that the woman had purchased poison at a drug store at Watertown, Minn. The evidence is circumstantial, but the state believes it has a strong case.

The Princeton Union
; July 9, 1908; p. 4.

___________________________

After being out five hours, the jury in the Caseheimer murder trial found Mrs. Theresa Caseheimer, the defendant, not guilty. After the judge had congratulated the jurymen for their attentiveness during the trial, the jury was discharged. 

The scene in the courtroom was an impressive one. The members of the family crowded around their mother, shedding tears of joy.

The case has been one of great interest throughout the country because the circumstantial evidence brought up against the defendant was so strong.

Mrs. Caseheimer hereafter will make her home in St. Paul, where she has obtained employment.

The Minneapolis Tribune
; “Mrs. Kasheimer Freed of Murder Charge”; July 23, 1908; p. 10.
           __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Wednesday, December 5, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 5

December 5, 1872 – Elizabeth Cady Stanton made her second visit to St. Cloud, Minn., on this date. Her lecture on this “visit was called ‘The Coming Girl’ and she urged women to ‘stop lacing and let their waists be as nature intended,’ to stay away from cosmetics, and to get a job so that they could provide for themselves.”  

http://wjon.com/this-date-in-central-minnesota-history-march-28th-1870/



Elizabeth Cady Stanton

http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fil:ElizabethCadyStanton-Veeder.LOC.jpg
           __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Monday, December 3, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 3

December 3, 1909 – The Red River Lumber Company has purchased the big sawmill at Scanlon (near Cloquet in Carlton County) owned by the Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company, and will dismantle the mill and remove the machinery to Akeley in Hubbard County, to replace the Red River Lumber Company’s sawmill that was destroyed by fire on November 21.

The Scanlon sawmill is one of the largest lumber sawing plants in the state, having a capacity of more than 500,000 feet per day.

R. F. Pray, general manager of the Red River Lumber Company’s interests at Akeley,  said today that the company would immediately begin the work of dismantling the Scanlon plant, and that he expected the mill would be sawing logs at Akeley within 70 days.

The Red River Lumber Company was fortunate in being able to secure the Scanlon mill, which was shut down a year ago due to a lack of raw materials with which to keep the saws in motion.

The Bemidji Daily Pioneer; “Red River Lumber Co. Buys Scanlon Sawmill. Will Dismantle and Remove Mill to Akaley to Replace Mill Recently Burned.”; Dec. 4, 1909; p. 4.




The Brooks-Scanlon Sawmill in 1908 

http://www.hardtocomeby.com/family-histories/scanlon-minnesotajune-1909-.html 





http://www.lakesnwoods.com/Scanlon.htm



http://www.lakesnwoods.com/Akeley.htm 

__________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including: census records, birth records, death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records. I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.





Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow. 


Website: TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Sunday, December 2, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 2


December 2, 1916 – Three workmen were killed and a fourth mortally injured late today when the large terra cotta cornice stone, weighing three tons, fell from the top of the new Rochester Masonic Temple, now under construction, a distance of 50 feet, carrying two of the men with it and striking two others who were working directly below. Scores of passerby witnessed the accident.

The dead:
Robert Mortenson, La Crosse, Wis.
Louis Bang, Rochester
Arthur Kruger, Mankato

The injured:
Andre Crawford, Chicago, both legs broken, head crushed; will die

The accident happened shortly after 3:15 p.m. Contractors were at a loss this evening to give a reason for the displacement of the stone. It had just been placed.

Mortenson and Bang were working on the cornice when, without warning of any kind, it swung from its position and fell to the ground. Both of the men were killed instantly.

Kruger and Crawford were working below. The stone struck them a glancing blow. Kruger was caught directly under it, and Crawford pinned beneath one side.

Crawford and Kruger were rushed to the City Hospital. Kruger died a few hours later. Physicians tonight expressed no hope for Crawford’s recovery.
Coroner J. E. Crewe has ordered a complete investigation.




The former Rochester Masonic Temple was destroyed in a fire in Feb. 1916.1 

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Cornice Stone at Rochester Falls; 3 Dead, 1 dying. Three-Ton Block at Top of Masonic Temple Topples Without Warning.”; Dec. 3, 1916; p. 1.

1http://www.lakesnwoods.com/RochesterGallery.htm
           __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Saturday, December 1, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 1

December 1, 1904 – Three men were arrested today by Minneapolis police for burglary: Ed Johnson, Harry Gilmore and A. W. Holmes.

According to Minneapolis Detectives Helin and Hansen, the trio trained young, small boys in the art of entering windows, pushing the miniature accomplices through small openings and then having them open the rear door from the inside. The rest was easy. The doors open, the burglars were free to ransack the premises, store way the plunder, and then, with their small friends in tow, move along to the next place due to be violated.

Several burglaries of this character, the police say, have been traced to Johnson, Gilmore and Holmes. The principal affair was the robbery of Larimee’s harness shop on Fourth Street South, on Thanksgiving Day, when fur coats and gloves worth about $400 were taken. The goods have been recovered by the detectives, who are now trying to connect the men with the burglary of F.S. Gold’s store at 312 First Avenue North.

The three men are now held at the Minneapolis central police station, while attempts are being made to locate the youngsters who assisted the men in the commission of their crimes.

St. Paul Globe; “Trio Accused of Bill Sykes Methods. Minneapolis Police Say Men Used Small Boys to Open Doors.”; Dec. 2, 1904; p.1.


Oliver is menaced by Bill Sykes in the 1948 version of Oliver Twist

http://www.moviesteve.com/see-this-oliver-twist-1948-dir-david-lean/
           __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Friday, November 30, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 30

November 30, 1996 — “While playing ‘Tiptoe through the Tulips’ at a gala benefit at The Woman's Club of Minneapolis, singer Tiny Tim [suffered] a heart attack on stage and [died] later at Hennepin County Medical Center.”

He is buried at Lakewood Cemetery in Minneapolis.

http://www.minnpost.com/politics-policy/2008/07/part-3-150-minnesota-moments-wed-just-soon-forget




Tiny Tim

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:TinyTim.jpg
           __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Thursday, November 29, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 29

November 29, 1971 – A press conference was held at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport two days after the well-mannered hijacker D. B Cooper jumped off Northwest Flight 305’s “rear stairway, presumably wearing a parachute and carrying a bag holding $200,000 in cash.”

http://blogs2.startribune.com/blogs/oldnews/archives/188



D. B. Cooper

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:DBCooper.jpg
           __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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