Saturday, August 18, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 18

August 18, 1929 – Attracted by the smells coming from the back of a fish delivery truck, a black bear followed the truck into downtown Duluth. The bear then turned his attention to the smells coming from the Hotel Duluth Coffee Shop.  [H]e “rose up on his hind feet and looked around as if greatly confused. He then walked over to the coffee shop and with one mighty blow of its paw, it smashed a fifteen foot tall plate glass window. Glass flew in every direction. The bear dropped to all fours and rushed through the window to the center of the coffee shop.”

After causing a ruckus in the coffee shop, the bear was eventually shot by a Duluth police officer.  “The magnificent animal was later sent to a local taxidermist and for many years was displayed in the front window of the "Black Bear Lounge" in the hotel. Presently it is on display in the main dining room of the original Grandma’s Saloon & Grill in Canal Park, Duluth.” 

http://www.cityhistory.us/duluth/architecture/hotelduluth.htm



http://zenithcity.com/zenith-city-history-archives/myths-notorious-tales/bear-and-drunk-square-off-at-the-hotel-duluth/
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com




Friday, August 17, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 17

August 17, 1905 – With a lead loaded billy club, J. Budd, a Minneapolis street lamp lighter, put two would-be highwaymen to utter rout on Park Avenue, between Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth Streets, at 3:30 this morning.

One of the would-be robbers was badly marked by Budd and both were glad to get away and avoid further punishment.

Budd had just put out a light on Park Avenue, near Twenty-seventh Street when two men, whom he had noticed sneaking along in dark spots, came up to him with revolvers in their hands.


Lamplighter1



“Hands up,” they ordered, pointing their firearms at Budd.

Budd’s hands went up in a hurry. In one of them he held a billy club. Hardly had the hands gone up than the right one holding the billy club came down again with terrific force.



Sample billy club2

One of the robbers received a terrible blow on the side of his head. He dropped like a log. Budd was just about to land on the second man when the latter stepped back and threatened to shoot.

At this juncture Budd took safety in flight. The robber ordered him to stop, but he kept on running.

The highwayman did not shoot, but contented himself with dragging his partner to a place of safety.

Budd is sure that the man he struck is badly marked and the police are on the lookout.

The Minneapolis Tribune; “’Billy’ In Hands of J. Budd, Plucky Lamplighter, Puts Highwaymen to Rout. Two Men Order Him to ‘Throw Up His Hands,’ Which He Promptly Does, Bringing One of Them Down Again Instantly and Felling His Assailant.”; Aug. 18, 1905; p. 7.
1http://www.junipercivic.com/historyArticle.asp?nid=13#.W2iP8NVKjFg

2Photo credit: <a href="https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/d2/d2/27/d2d227ca4c1f813cf84a56ebe29a939f.jpg">Pinimg.com</a>

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com



Thursday, August 16, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 16


August 16, 1912 – A party of Minneapolis men, headed by E. P. Moorhead, who has been prospecting in the vicinity of Northome, Koochiching County, Minn., arrived in Duluth tonight and reported the discovery of gold in paying quantities there. The deposit is said to be both ore and placer. It is claimed that the ore averaged about $20 to the ton.

The prospectors claim that the district will prove an important gold field.
_______________________________

“As early as 1865 prospectors began coming into the Rainy River and Rainy Lake area on both the Canadian and American sides, to search for precious minerals. George W. Davis, a prospector, arrived at the Little American Island in Rainy Lake in July of 1893. He panned some quartz and found gold. News of his discovery spread quickly and soon hundreds of prospectors were streaming into the region. Mining operations by the Bevier Mining and Milling Company were in full swing on the Little American Island by 1894. Mines were also opened on the Dry Weed and Bushy Head Islands.”1

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune
; “Minneapolitans Strike Gold. Party headed by E. P. Moorhead Find Ore Near Northome, Minn.”; Aug. 17, 1912; p. 1.

1http://www.co.koochiching.mn.us/220/The-Age-of-Mining





http://www.lakesnwoods.com/Northome.htm

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                        


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com





Wednesday, August 15, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 15

August 15, 1911 – Mrs. Albert O. Bourne was found murdered five miles east of Montevideo, Minn., today. She lived with her husband eight miles from town.

The couple had been married two months.

Neighbors say Mr. and Mrs. Bourne left their home for a drive. They were seen near the scene of the crime. Later Mrs. Bourne was found near the roadside with her skull crushed by a blunt instrument, possibly a stone.

There was nothing on her person to identify her and not until a horse found near the body was turned loose and led the searchers to the Bourne home was her identity established.

On Dec. 13, 1911, Albert O. Bourne was found guilty of first degree murder by a jury of his peers. He was sentenced to hard labor at Stillwater for life by Judge Quale. It is estimated that the case cost Chippewa County more than $5,000.

The Duluth Herald; “Woman Is Murdered. Mrs. Albert O. Bourne Beaten to Death Near Montevideo.”; Aug. 16, 1911; p. 6.

Little Falls Herald; “Husband Accused of Crime. Woman Found Murdered Near Montevideo, Minn.”; Aug. 25, 1911; p. 4.

The Duluth Herald; “Wife Slayer Gets Life.”; Dec. 15, 1911; p. 26.


http://montechamber.com/

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com






Tuesday, August 14, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 14

August 14, 1923 – Minneapolis Police Officer Emil Engstrom was shot and killed while attempting to arrest a robbery suspect. Officer Engstrom, one of the agency's taxicab inspectors, was riding with the president of a taxi company when he observed the suspect wanted for a robbery earlier in the day. When he approached the man the suspect shot him in the neck. The suspect fled but surrendered two days later. He was sentenced to life in prison.

Officer Engstrom had only been with the agency for eight months and was survived by his wife.



Emil Engstrom
https://www.odmp.org/officer/4599-officer-emil-engstrom
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com




Monday, August 13, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 13


August 13, 1911 – Wm. L. Stubbs, 48 years old of St. Paul, was found dead today in Calvary Cemetery, St. Paul, beside his mother’s grave. One of the wardens of the cemetery found Stubbs. In his left hand a little card containing his farewell words, “A better wife than mine never lived.”

Stubbs, who was born and raised in St. Paul, entered the former Powers Dry Goods Company employ in 1879, and stayed with the firm when it later was changed into the firm of Tibbs & Hutchins until it failed in business. He frequently was observed brooding of the failure of the firm with which he was connected practically all his life.

His death was a suicide caused by a gunshot to the head.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Man Is Found Dead on Mother’s Grave”; Aug. 14, 1911; p. 6.


http://www.catholic-cemeteries.org/calvary.aspx

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com




Sunday, August 12, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 12


“The Grip of ‘The Human Fly.’
He Uses But the First Three Fingers of Each Hand.”


August 12, 1916
– With approximately 5,000 people watching, H. H. Gardiner, dubbed as “The Human Fly” by President Grover Cleveland in 1905, climbed the front of the Alworth Building, a 15-story structure in downtown Duluth—the second tallest building in Minnesota—this noon in less than half an hour, which is a few minutes under the time it took him to ascend the front of the Torrey Building, a nine-story structure, last Wednesday.


Alworth Building1

Gardiner had far less difficulty in climbing the Alworth Building because the front of that structure is marked with steel decorations, which made it easy for him to secure the necessary holds. The Alworth is tailor-made for “The Human Fly,” and he just walked up it. At the fifteenth story he experienced a little difficulty, but not for long.

When he reached the roof of the building he climbed to the top of the flagstaff and waved to the thousands of upturned eyes that were anxiously watching his every move.

Gardiner made today’s climb for the Interstate Auto Company. The company handles the KisselKar, and when he reached the first story of the building he gave a short talk, explaining that as a climber, the KisselKar was his only competitor. At various stops in during his ascension he would shout to the crowd, “Don’t forget,” and the multitudes below would respond, “The KisselKar.”

The Duluth Herald; “’Human Fly’ Climbs Front of the Alworth Building”; Aug. 12, 1916; p. 4.



KisselKar Ad2




Human Fly Crawls Up Walls of Camden, NJ Courthouse3


1https://www.perfectduluthday.com/2017/08/09/postcards-alworth-building/

2https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kissel_Motor_Car_Company#/media/File:Kisselkar_1915-0223.jpg
3https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Gardiner#/media/File:Human_Fly_crawls_up_walls_of_Camden_NJ_Courthouse_cropped_Feb_10_1915.png

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com



Saturday, August 11, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 11

August 11, 1914 – Guarded by four veteran express messengers each armed with a sawed-off double barreled shotgun the first shipment of emergency currency arrived in Minneapolis today and was distributed to the Northwestern, First and Security National Banks based on the Aldrich-Vreeland EmergencyCurrency Act of 1914. The shipment totaled $2,605,000. It was in denominations of $5, $10 and $20 bills. It was tucked away in eight large safes weighing nearly a half a ton apiece.

The money is unsigned and each bank immediately detailed a force of men to cut it and apply the signatures of the president and cashier. Machines are used that cut it and sign it at the same time. A portion of the money was placed in circulation and it is expected that the entire lot will be ready tomorrow.




The Northwestern National Bank received $1,160,000. It was in 34 bundles. The First National Bank got $1,000,000 in 32 bundles and the Security National Bank $445,000 in 14 bundles. This money does not differ from the ordinary greenback or national bank note. There isn’t anything about the money to signify that it was issued for emergency purposes. E. N. Davis, the express messenger in charge of the shipment that it was the largest amount of money he had ever guarded during his 29 years of service in express work. W. P. Fredrickson, Edward A. Cox and J. Sloan, the other guards, also said it was the most they had ever carried. They left Chicago at 9:55 Monday night over the Milwaukee Road, arriving in Minneapolis at 8 a. m. 

This is only the first allotment of the emergency currency that will come to Minneapolis. Only the money for Minneapolis was received today. The St. Paul shipment that will amount to nearly as much as Minneapolis received was delayed because of the transmittal of the securities. St. Paul banks were a day later than Minneapolis in sending the bonds to Washington.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Guards with Sawed-Off Shutguns Guarding Money Sent to Minneapolis for Use in Emergency Cases”; Aug. 12, 1914; p. 7.

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com






Friday, August 10, 2018

On this Date in Minnesota History: August 10

August 10, 1916 – An epidemic of typhoid fever that threatened a band of 150 Chippewa Indians on a small reservation at Grand Portage, in the extreme northeastern part of Minn., is probably averted, according to Dr. H. M. Bracken, executive officer of the state board of health. He returned today after having investigated health conditions on the reservation at the request of federal officials.

“The water supply was the greatest health menace I found,” said Dr. Bracken.

Typhoid fever is a serious disease spread by contaminated food and water.1

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Typhoid Epidemic Among Indians Believed Averted.”; August 11, 1911; p. 1.

1http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/typhoid



http://www.grandportage.com/images/newmap.jpg
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com




Thursday, August 9, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 9

August 9, 1906 – Byron Andrews, a Cass Lake photographer, was taken from his home at 11 p.m. this evening by an infuriated crowd of prominent citizens, carried one mile into the woods and stripped naked and tarred and feathered.

He was then bound to a tree and given orders to leave before morning.

His actions have been suspicious for a long time, and one mother tacked signs throughout Cass Lake that her young daughter was brutally treated by him. When the statement was verified, the indignation of every citizen in the town was aroused.

Andrews begged like a whipped cur when citizens came for him, but no sympathy or mercy was shown him. He has no family.

The Minneapolis Journal; “Citizens Mob A Cass Lake Artist. Bryon Andrews Tarred and Banished for Crimes Against Little Girls.”; Aug. 10, 1906; p. 1.



https://www.mprnews.org/story/2008/07/28/casslakecops
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com




Wednesday, August 8, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 8


August 8, 1924 – Mike Corpstein and N. B. Schmitz, who are doing some cement work at the Scheech Mill 5-1/2 miles northwest of Caledonia, discovered the head and body of Esther Midby, aged 6, who was drown in Beaver Creek more than two years ago. After the finding of the head, the mill pond was dragged and the rest of the body was brought to the surface.

Mrs. Midby, wife of Gunder Midby and four children, Esther; Lucille, aged 5; Genevieve, aged 2 and Arthur, aged 4 months, were all drowned in Beaver Creek on March 5, 1922, when attempting to ford a swollen creek, the sleigh they were in struck a rock and capsized, throwing them into the ice cold water. Mr. Midby and the driver of the sleigh, Robert Wisland, were the only survivors. The accident happened about ¾ of a mile above what is called the Messeral Place, where the regular creek is forded. At the time of the tragedy the creek was about 30 feet wide and the water about five feet deep.



Beaver Creek, Houston County, Minn.1


All the bodies were found, within a few days following the accident, except that of the oldest girl, Esther, and after a two weeks search it was given up by authorities, but not Mr. Midby, who continued his search for months.

The Daily Post and Record; “Body Found, Drowned Two Years Ago. Body of Esther Bidby (sic), Drowned In Beaver Creek With Other Members of Family Recovered”; Rochester, Minn.; Aug. 14, 1924; p. 2.

1http://www.exploreminnesota.com/things-to-do/2859/beaver-creek-valley-state-park-activities

Five members of the Gunder Midby family of Sheldon, Houston County, Minn., met their death in the waters of East Beaver Creek. See March 5, 2018 blog.
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com







Tuesday, August 7, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 7

August 7, 1911 – Suffering from possible severe internal injuries and from a painful jolt in the abdomen, W. L. Manyen, conductor of an ore train on the Great Northern road, is at the Adams Hospital as the result of a wreck on his train this evening around 5 at Acropolis, near Bengal, about 20 miles west of Hibbing.

Carl Johnson, brakeman on the train, was severely burned. He was brought to the hospital also, but later in the evening left for his home at Kelly Lake.

As near as can be ascertained the wreck was caused by the “breaking” of the loaded ore train five cars from the engine. The train was an exceptionally long one consisting of 120 cars and was bound for the ore docks at Allouez, Wis.



Cars of ore from the Minnesota iron range going onto loading docks at Allouez, Wis.1 


Conductor Manyen was sitting at his desk in the caboose when the cars parted, throwing him heavily against the desk. It is not known just how the brakeman received his burns.

Eight cars were derailed on account of the accident. The track was not cleared for a couple of hours after the accident and therefore the “wooden shoe” passenger due to arrive in Hibbing at 6:25 did not arrive until 8 p.m.

The Duluth Herald; “Conductor Is Injured. Brakeman Also Hurt When Great Northern Train Breaks in Two. Train of 120 Ore Cars Bound for the Allouez Docks Is Wrecked.”; Aug. 8, 1911; p. 5.

1http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsa.8c20212/

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com





Monday, August 6, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 6

August 6, 1920 – An order directing payment of back pay to members of the First Minnesota field artillery and certain companies of the Minnesota infantry was issued today by the militia bureau to the Central Army Dept. at Chicago, according to word received this evening from Washington. The pay has been held up for more than a year and is said to be due for the period between the mobilization of the unit and its induction into federal service.

Congressman Walter H. Newton of Minneapolis took the matter of the back pay up with the bureau, bringing it to attention about a month ago. His appeal for action was followed later by Colonel Minnigerode and Major S. G. Collins, who urged payment of the funds due the Minnesota men.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “First Minnesota Men’s Back Pay Authorized”; Aug. 7, 1920; p. 2.



Minnesota Capitol Grounds

Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain 8-06-2018, 
as long as acknowledgement included.
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com