Monday, December 5, 2016

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 5

December 5, 2007 – “A man clearing snow off the glass roof of the IDS Center skyscraper's atrium slipped, crashed through the roof, and fell about five or six stories to his death.”

http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2007/12/05/ids_accident/



IDS Crystal Court
Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain Aug. 6, 2012,
as long as acknowledgement included.
 

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com 

 

Sunday, December 4, 2016

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 4

December 4, 1911 - The Minneapolis Park Board voted unanimously this afternoon to designate Fair Oaks, the William Drew Washburn property, for park purposes.





Today’s Washburn Fair Oaks Park

Mr. Washburn’s offer to sell the property, which is bounded by Twenty-second Street on the north, Twenty-fourth Street on the south, Third Avenue on the east and Stevens Avenue on the west, to the park board for $200,000 was read. M. B. Koon said that when the property for the art museum (now the Minnesota Institute of Arts) was given to the city and the funds were yet to be raised for the building, several interested citizens thought of securing Fair Oakes as a suitable approach for the museum. Steps taken last winter by individuals and later in the spring by the Civic Commission brought about the offer to sell the Washburn tract to the city as an approach to the museum, he said.


One of the provisions of Mr. Washburn’s offer was that the residence be retained for the use of Mr. and Mrs. Washburn during their lifetime. Mr. Washburn died July 29, 1912; his wife Elizabeth died April 28, 1916. The mansion was demolished by the park board in 1924.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Famed Old Homestead to Be Bought for Park. Board Unanimously Votes to Accept W. D. Washburn’s Offer of Fair Oaks. Purchase on Terms Proposed by Owner $200,000 and Life Tenure. Resolution Offered to Acquire Block Fronting Municipal Building.”; Dec. 5, 1911; p. 1.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Mrs. W. D. Washburn Dies in New Jersey; Was Pioneer Here. Widow of Late United States Senator Came to Minneapolis in 1859.”; April 29, 1916; p. 1.



 Historical Marker 

Text


Fair Oaks
A Mansion for a Park


Did you know that ‘Washburn Fair Oakes’ was originally the name of the mansion that once stood here?


One of the largest homes in Minneapolis in the 1880s, it was built by William D. Washburn. His brother Cadwallader Washburn founded the Washburn Crosby Mill, which later became General Mills, the home of Gold medal Flour.

William, an early parks advocate, donated land for Minnehaha Parkway. He later sold his estate to the Park Board in 1911 for $250,000, the value of the land alone. The buildings themselves were worth $400,000 at the time. In 1915, after both Washburns passed away, the Park Board took control of the buildings as well as the park.

Though the castle-like three-story mansion was once considered for use as the Park Board’s offices, how to put it to good use as a park structure was never resolved. The board denied the first petition to raze the house in 1916. Several community and civic groups used the house into the 1920a, but one by one, buildings were removed. First the greenhouse, then the barn, and finally the mansion itself was razed in 1924, against the protests of many. The last significant element of the estate to go was the wrought iron fence that once surrounded the site. It was sold for scrap iron to support the war in 1942.

Though several grand plans for the park have been developed over the year, it has changed little since the buildings were removed. It remains one of the few parks in Minneapolis to retain a quiet pastoral feel in the style of late nineteenth-century parks. Of the entire estate, the oaks themselves have proven to be…”the fairest of them all.



Enlarged photo of Washburns’ Fair Oaks Mansion from historical marker



Photos taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain Dec. 4, 2016, 

as long as acknowledgement included.

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com 


Saturday, December 3, 2016

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 3

December 3, 1916 – Dr. Robinson Bosworth, secretary of the Minnesota State Health Association; President Frank Wells of the Moorhead Normal School, and Dr. O. J. Hagen of Moorhead, addressed more than 1,500 persons who attended the opening of the Clay-Becker County Tuberculosis Sanatorium near Lake Park, Minn., today.



Clay-Becker County Tuberculosis Sanatorium1

The joint county hospital, built to house and care for 32 tubercular patients, was constructed at a cost of $52,000.

Shortly after opening, the name was changed to the Sand Beach Sanatorium
.1

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “New Tuberculosis Sanatorium Opens. Clay-Becker County Hospital Cost $52,000—Will House Thirty-two Patients.”; Dec. 4, 1916; p. 3.

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com 

 




Friday, December 2, 2016

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 2

December 2, 1921 – Menaced by a bandit’s gun, Justice of the Peace V. D. Crandall shot him down on the streets of Robbinsdale, Minn., Friday and recovered $1,500 that the man had just stolen from the Security State Bank. The man was identified as G. G. Farrel of Minneapolis.

With a mask over his eyes, the man entered the bank when Ole Orvum, 24, and Miss Carrie McDougall were alone. He thrust a gun at Orvum and demanded the money. Miss McDougall started the burglar alarm and the bandit fled.

A. B. Wallace, real estate dealer, borrowed a revolver; Crandall accompanied him, and they followed the bandit. Wallace and Crandall called to him to halt, and the bandit drew his gun. Crandall grabbed the revolver from Wallace and fired. The bandit fell dead.

The Bemidji Daily Pioneer; “Recovers Stolen Money After Daring Robbery”; Dec. 3, 1921; p. 1.




Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain Dec. 2, 2016,
 as long as acknowledgement included.

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com 


 



Thursday, December 1, 2016

On This Date in Minnesota History: December 1

December 1, 1916 – In one of its first opinions bearing on the statute to prevent murderers from profiting from their crimes, the Minnesota State Supreme Court today affirmed the decision of the Hennepin County District Court in the action by Lewis Sharpless against the Grand Lodge of A. O. U. W. of Minnesota and Charlotte Sharpless, from which the grand lodge appealed.

Charlotte Sharpless was the beneficiary of a $2,000 certificate of insurance, issued by the Workmen organization on the life of her husband, Leaming Sharpless, and was convicted of murdering her husband and sentenced to the state prison.



Leaming Sharpless1

Lewis Sharpless sued, contending that as the woman as beneficiary took the life of the insured, she could not recover and that he, being the brother and only surviving heir at law and next of kin, except the widow, was entitled to the proceeds of the certificate. Mrs. Sharpless admitted the record of her conviction and sentence for the murder but claimed that she was entitled to the proceeds.

The grand lodge held that she had forfeited her rights and therefore it was not liable to either the woman or Lewis Sharpless under its laws. The plaintiff demurred on the ground that it did not state facts sufficient to constitute a defense.

The court holds that by murdering the insured the beneficiary forfeits the right to the proceeds of the policy, but that such murder does not relieve the insurer from liability to others and that in such case the sole heir of the deceased, who would take upon the death of an eligible beneficiary, may recover.

Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Lewis Sharpless Wins Brother’s Insurance. Supreme Court Rules Against the Convicted Widow in Sword Murder Case.”; Dec. 2, 1916; p. 15.

1The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; Dec. 18, 1914


Leaming Sharpless murdered by saber; wife in next room hears nothing; see Nov. 14, 2015 blog.

Blood-stained imprint of fingers on the sword that killed Leaming Sharpless may be the principal means of determining the murderer; see 
Nov. 15, 2015 blog.

Mrs. Sharpless indicted by the Hennepin County Grand Jury for murder in the first degree in the killing of her husband; see Nov. 17, 2015 blog.


Sharpless had two insurance policies for $5,000; made wife beneficiary; see Nov. 23, 2015 blog.


Mrs. Sharpless found guilty of first degree murder; sentenced to life in prison; see Dec. 12, 2015 blog.

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com 

 


Wednesday, November 30, 2016

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 30

November 30, 1922 – Youthful bandits, so nervous they spilled silver coins all over the floor in their haste to gather up their loot, held up the Elgin Creamery Company at the supper hour this evening and escaped with the cash. The amount they got has not been definitely determined, but officials believe it to be about $3,000.

Two of the youths entered the creamery offices through a rear basement door while a partner guarded the rear door. Reaching the office, one of the bandits carried a gun and told R. E. Hanson, secretary-treasurer of the company, to back up to the wall. Hanson was alone in the office and was counting receipts from the last two days.

While one youth guarded Hanson, the other grabbed a bag and began dumping bills and coins into it. All money was raked off a desk and a cash drawer in the safe was emptied. Dozens of coins rolled onto the floor and the clink of falling money hastened the bandits’ work. They backed out of the rear door and disappeared with their lookout among the creamery’s wagons and trucks.

Hanson tried to chase the boys but was unable to do anything in the darkness. He then notified the sheriff’s office.  The creamery is located just outside the Minneapolis, Minn., city limits (would now be located in Edina).

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “$3,000 Stolen in Bandit Raid. Youths Spill Silver Coins in Haste to Escape With Elgin Creamery Loot.”; Dec. 1, 1922; p. 1.


Examples of old milk cans


http://dailyreporter.com/files/2009/10/creameries-0-102309.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including: census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at: pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com   




Tuesday, November 29, 2016

On This Date in Minnesota History: November 29

November 29, 1954 – Filmmaker Joel Coen was born in St. Louis Park, Minn., on this date.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coen_brothers


File:COEN Brothers (cannesPH).jpg

Ethan Coen, left;  Joel Coen, right.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:COEN_Brothers_(cannesPH).jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com