Monday, August 21, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 21

August 21, 1918 - A large and destructive tornado, estimated as an F4, devastated the town of Tyler, Minn. on this date. The “tornado hit the town at approximately 9:20 p.m., killing 36 people and injuring over 100 others. Debris from Tyler was found up to 23 miles (37 km) away. It is the fourth-deadliest tornado in Minnesota's history.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1918_Tyler_tornado



http://www3.gendisasters.com/files/files/newphotos2/tyler_minn_tornado_8-21-1918_2.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Sunday, August 20, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 20

August 20, 1905 – St. Cloud and Sauk Rapids were swept by a storm that threatened to take the proportions of a tornado at 5:15 this afternoon. Although the storm lasted just 22 minutes, property valued at many thousands of dollars was destroyed and two persons were injured.

Glass was broken; crops injured; electric light, street railway and telephone and telegraph wires blown down and a large lumber mill twirled into a wrecked mass of lumber and iron.

The mill was owned by the Julius Neils Lumber Company and was located in Sauk Rapids. Huge piles of lumber were blown away. Some of the timbers were hurled toward the city and some were swept into the river, the swift current quickly carrying them away. It is probable this lumber concern is the heaviest individual loser from the storm.


Julius Neils1

The J. Neils Lumber Company was incorporated on March 23, 1895, in Sauk Rapids,
Minn., with a capital investment of $30,000.2


John Welm and William Strommel, both of St. Cloud, were hurt. Welm’s horse became frightened and ran away. He was thrown out of the buggy and sustained a double fracture of the leg and a broken nose. Strommel was standing on a sidewalk when the storm broke and he was struck in the head by a piece of flying glass. His scalp was injured slightly.

The wind played havoc with windows, shade trees and wood sheds in St. Cloud and Sauk Rapids. Probably 1,000 panes of glass in both cities were broken.

The Minneapolis Journal; “Two Hurt at St. Cloud. Storm Threatened to Assume Proportions of Tornado.”; August 21, 1905; p. 6.

1http://dnrc.mt.gov/divisions/forestry/docs/docs-forestry-pioneers/jneils.png

2http://dnrc.mt.gov/divisions/forestry/forestry-pioneers/j-neils-family

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Saturday, August 19, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 19

August 19, 1903 – Murder, supposed for the purpose of robbery, was committed across the river from Winona, a short distance from the end of the high wagon bridge, at an early hour this morning. The victim was a working man about 28 years of age, whose name, according to papers found on his person, was Newton Hellyer, and who up to two days ago had been employed in the government quarry at Lamollie, before that working as a carpenter and brakeman for the Milwaukee & St. Paul road.



Winona High Wagon Bridge1

A coroner’s inquest was held over the body by Justice Ulrich of Fountain City and a verdict returned that Hellyer came to his death by violent means at the hands of unknown persons.

Hellyer had first been struck on the back of the head by a blunt instrument and then his head had been partially severed from his body with a pocketknife, cutting from behind.

The body was first seen in the road about 4 this morning and the authorities were notified. District Attorney Feegina of Buffalo County was at the inquest and is working up the case. Hellyer was seen in several Winona saloons yesterday.

At the inquest Hammerich testified he saw Hellyer at the “Mint” at 8 last night in the company of Henry Keen. Three men, one of them Hellyer, are said to have gone over the high wagon bridge at 3 this morning.

Another clue is that two men tried to board an east-bound freight train at Marsh, soon after the murder is supposed to have occurred, and, failing, started to walk down the track.

The Minneapolis Journal; “Head Almost Cut From Body. Mangled Corpse of Newton Hellyer, Who Had Been Murdered, Found Near Winona. Neck Had Been Cut With a Pocket Knife—Robbery the Motive Probably.”; August 19, 1903; p. 1.

1http://www.lakesnwoods.com/images/Winona9.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.



Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Friday, August 18, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota history: August 18

August 18, 1934 – Vincent Bugliosi, attorney best known for prosecuting Charles Manson and other defendants accused of the Tate-LaBianca murders,1 and author (“Helter-Skelter”), was born on this date in Hibbing, Minn.

1http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincent_Bugliosi

http://timelines.ws/states/MINNESOTA.HTML




Vincent Bugliosi
http://minnesotabrown.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/89._Vincent_Bugliosi.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                        


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
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Thursday, August 17, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 17

August 17, 1904 – The body of Miss Aagot Dahl, who disappeared with her father last April from her homestead near Quiring post office, was found on this date.


*
 

Lying in a pile of brush, with the rank, tall grass growing around and concealing it from view, the badly decomposed corpse of the murdered girl was discovered this afternoon by Thomas Dooher, a neighbor, who was working on the edge of his field about a mile and a half from the dead woman’s claim.

The grass and weeds concealed the body so well that Dooher struck one of the shoes with his scythe, and investigating, was horrified at the shocking spectacle.

He immediately set out for Tenstrike, the nearest railroad station, and notified the authorities there.


**


The discovery of the girl’s body disposes of an abduction/hostage theory, but adds to the mystery and brings the case within the pale of those crimes that excite and interest humanity because of their strangeness and horror.

Miss Dahl and her father, N. O. Dahl, are believed to have been murdered April 7, 1904, the day they disappeared. A constant search was made for both of the Dahls’ bodies after their disappearance. Rewards had been offered by the state and county, and also by relatives of the missing parties. 

The body of Mr. Dahl was discovered under the roots of a balsam tree near his house on July 26, 1904, by Eugene Colwell and Owen French, two homesteaders who lived a short distance from the Dahl homestead.

Colwell and French claimed they had gone out searching for a cow that had strayed away from Colwell’s home and in passing a tree became aware of a smell of putrid flesh. They immediately became suspicious and commenced a search around the area where the stench seemed to come from, and found a human body buried under roots of a balsam tree that had blown down during a storm.

Even after the discovery of Miss Dahl, no definite clues were available that would lead to the identity of the murderers, but it is said that several parties were under suspicion. Both decedents, Mr. and Miss Dahl, were found with gunshot holes in their skulls.


The Minneapolis Journal; “Miss Dahl’s Body Found in a Field. Corpse of Murdered Girl Stumbled Upon by a Homesteader While at Work.”; August 18, 1904; p. 2.

The Bemidji Daily Pioneer; “wen French and Eugene Colwell Discovered the Body Yesterday Afternoon.”; July 27, 1904; p. 4.

*http://townmapsusa.com/images/maps/map_of_quiring_mn.jpg

**http://www.lakesnwoods.com/images/Picture%20288.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Wednesday, August 16, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 16

August 16, 1912 – A party of Minneapolis men, headed by E. P. Moorhead, who has been prospecting in the vicinity of Northome, Koochiching County, Minn., arrived in Duluth tonight and report the discovery of gold in paying quantities there. The deposit is said to be both ore and placer. It is claimed that the ore averaged about $20 to the ton.

The prospectors claim that the district will prove an important gold field.
_______________________________

“As early as 1865 prospectors began coming into the Rainy River and Rainy Lake area [in Koochiching County] on both the Canadian and American sides, to search for precious minerals. George W. Davis, a prospector, arrived at the Little American Island in Rainy Lake in July of 1893. He panned some quartz and found gold. News of his discovery spread quickly and soon hundreds of prospectors were streaming into the region. Mining operations by the Bevier Mining and Milling Company were in full swing on the Little American Island by 1894. Mines were also opened on the Dry Weed and Bushy Head Islands.”1

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Minneapolitans Strike Gold. Party headed by E. P. Moorhead Find Ore Near Northome, Minn.”; Aug. 17, 1912; p. 1.

1http://www.co.koochiching.mn.us/220/The-Age-of-Mining


http://www.lakesnwoods.com/Northome.htm

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Tuesday, August 15, 2017

On This Date in Minnesota History: August 15

August 15, 1905 – The Cass Lake land office opened at 9 a.m. sharp and the next half-hour witnessed some exciting scenes. Wragge, the first man in line, filed on lots one, two and three, section seventeen, one mile west of the village along the Great Northern railway. He and approximately 29 others in line had been holding vigil in front of the Cass Lake land office beginning Aug. 1 to ensure they would secure the claims they had selected.

The three women in line, Mrs. Keefe of Cass Lake, being number 12; Mrs. Austin and Mrs. Relyea of Nebish, numbers 19 and 20 respectively, were all successful in having their filings accepted.

Persons who had settled on the land started for the land office at breakneck speed. Lars Elmquist, the man who settled on land, came to the office and filed with no opposition. Then Dr. Christenson of Cass Lake mounted on a thoroughbred running horse with a record of a mile in 1:50, dismounted at the land office door and filed, having established a settlement on his land.

He was followed by his sister, Miss Marie Christenson, who drove to the office with the fastest running horse owned here and filed with no opposition.

The work was handled very expeditiously, the first four filings being disposed of in two and one-half minutes. The great interest in the opening shows the reservation lands are much wanted by settlers.

It is probable that many contests will be started between those who settled on the land and others who offered their filings at the land office.

The Minneapolis Journal; “Busy Scenes At office. Four Women Among Land Hunters at Cass Lake.”; Aug. 15, 1905; p. 2.

The Bemidji Daily Pioneer; “Holds It ‘Way Up. No. 1 at Cass Lake Land Office Door Thinks His Place Worth $1500. Thirty People Already in Line for Aug. 15 Opening. Great interest Manifested in the Opening Set for That Date.”; Aug. 5, 1905; p. 4.




https://img.apmcdn.org/905154a315f8e54cb7c4c5a591e013821505ae35/uncropped/3a679c-20080728-casslakewelcome.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com