Wednesday, May 27, 2015

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 27

May 27, 1929 – Minnesota-native and famous aviator Charles Lindbergh (27) wed author Anne Morrow (22) at the home of her parents in Englewood, New Jersey, on this date.



*Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh 


 http://www.historyorb.com/day/may/27

*http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Morrow_Lindbergh



               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MHS records.  Both short searches and family history reports.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com ®  click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com  





Tuesday, May 26, 2015

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 26

May 26, 1902 – Mrs. G. Fred Stevens, widow of the late surveyor general of logs and lumber for the Duluth district, was today appointed by Gov. Van Sant to fill her husband’s unexpired term. Friends of the late official united in urging the appointment of Mrs. Stevens. This is the first time such an office has been held by a woman. Mrs. Stevens will fill it until Jan. 1.

The Minneapolis Journal; “Mrs. Stevens Appointed. Succeeds Her Late Husband as Surveyor General of Logs.”; May 26, 1902; p. 2.


               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MHS records.  Both short searches and family history reports.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com ®  click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com  
 






Monday, May 25, 2015

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 25

May 25, 1917 - The Ramsey County grand jury in St. Paul this afternoon returned indictments against Frank J. Dunn, Mike Moore, Joe Redenbaugh and Frank McCool, charging them with first degree murder in connection with the death of Mrs. Alice McQuillan Dunn, whose husband is among those indicted.



McCool, Connery, Moore and Dunn1

Redenbaugh, confessed slayer of Minneapolis Patrolman and Mrs. Dunn, entered the state penitentiary in Stillwater late today, to begin serving a sentence of life imprisonment as Convict “No. 5569.” He will be assigned to work in the prison twine plant, but in just what capacity is not yet known.


Joe Redenbaugh2



Stillwater State Prison, Bayport, Minn.3


The Bismarck Tribune;”Redenbaugh Starts His Life Sentence”; May 26, 1917; p. 1.

St. Paul Daily News; “Redenbaugh Now Convict No. 5569. Arrest of William Hickey Held Strong Link in Dunn Murder Case.”; May 26, 1917; pp. 1 & 6.


1Reading Eagle; “The Nightmare Murder; Bad dreams at an end, this was reality: her sister being shot to death.”; Reading, PA; May 24, 1964; pp. 71 & 72.

1http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1955&dat=19640524&id=bSArAAAAIBAJ&sjid=cZ0FAAAAIBAJ&pg=3914,4610516

2St. Paul Daily News, May 16, 1917; p. 1.

3Photos taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain 2-21-2013, as long as acknowledgement included.



               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MHS records.  Both short searches and family history reports.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com ®  click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com 


 

Sunday, May 24, 2015

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 24

May 24, 1951 – After only three weeks playing for the Minneapolis Millers, Willie Mays was called up by the Giants on this date. Mays found out he was being called up while at a movie theater in Sioux City, Iowa, after a message flashed up on the screen that said: "WILLIE MAYS CALL YOUR HOTEL.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willie_Mays




Willie Mays
http://tonyquarrington.wordpress.com/tag/minneapolis-millers/

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MHS records.  Both short searches and family history reports.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com ®  click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com 


 






Saturday, May 23, 2015

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 23

May 23, 1896 – The life of Rev. Francis Hermans began to publicly unravel on this date. 


Rev. Francis Hermans1

The Salt Lake Herald’s lead story was about the discovery of the burned remains of a woman found in the furnace of the First Scandinavian Methodist Church, Salt Lake City, a church where Hermans had been the minister up until a few weeks earlier.



The Salt Lake Herald’s lead story2



First Scandinavian Methodist Church, Salt Lake City2


 In fact, Hermans had been a minister for a number of Scandinavian churches over the years, including one in Minneapolis. He had been ministering in Salt Lake City since 1893.


In April 1896, a shortage of $1,000 was found in the church accounts. Hermans blamed it on his poor bookkeeping skills, and told the congregation he would get the money from relatives to replenish the coffers. His parishioners trusted him and believed him. On May 6, 1896, when he boarded an east-bound train to supposedly obtain the money, members of his congregation were at the train station to see him off. That was the last time he was seen by anyone who could positively identify him.

A substitute pastor was appointed to handle Hermans’ duties while he was gone, and it was he, two weeks later, who discovered some bones, false teeth, a belt buckle, garter belt, and razors and knives in the church furnace while inspecting the premises. The police were called, and laboratory tests indicated the teeth—and more than likely the bones—belonged to Henrietta Clausen, a young woman who had worked as Hermans’ housekeeper for a time.




Miss Henrietta Clausen2


 She was last seen Sept. 29, 1895, talking in the hallway to Rev. Hermans after church services. The reverend later told everyone she made an improper proposal to him, and upon his rejection of her, had left his employ. He later claimed he had received a letter from Helena, Mont., saying she was living there in a house of ill repute.


Annie Samuelson, the serving girl who replaced Miss Clausen in working for Hermans, has also disappeared. Samuelson told her aunt, who lived in Salt Lake City, and relatives in Crookston, Minn., that she and Hermans were getting married. She had also admitted to her aunt that Hermans had gotten her pregnant, but that he had taken care of it.



Miss Annie Samuelson3

At the end of January 1896, Samuelson told her aunt that she and Hermans were going to Ogden, UT, to get married. Several days later, her aunt received a telegram and a letter from her niece saying that she had broken it off with Hermans, and was going back home to Sweden to get away from any sad memories of their relationship. Samuelson never made it home, and was never seen again; but her clothes and many of her belongings were.




A watch and ring belonging to Samuelson were found to have been pawned by Hermans.1

It was also discovered that Hermans had given away woman’s clothing to other churches and some friends after Samuelson’s disappearance, claiming they had belonged to his deceased wife; however, they all bore the initials “A. K. S.,” indicating they belonged to Annie Samuelson.

Salt Lake City police believe Samuelson was also murdered by Hermans. He was known to take many late night buggy rides, and it is surmised that during one of these rides, he disposed of her body. A box of poisonous drugs was found in the room formerly occupied by the pastor, and it is thought that Samuelson was poisoned and then chopped up, with pieces of her thrown throughout the Salt Lake City area.



Poison Bottle1

As authorities began to look into Hermans’ background, it became apparent that he had been associated with other mysterious disappearances and murders. His first wife and youngest child both died under unusual circumstances in England; the older son was taken in by his wife’s relatives.

Shortly thereafter, Hermans came to the U.S. While ministering at a church in Minneapolis, he met and married his second wife, Miss Bertha Wangen, a Minneapolis girl. She was somewhat good looking, but lacking in education to such an extent that it was a matter of common mention among the congregation. Mrs. Herman’s sister, Miss Carrie Wangen, lived with the couple when they moved to a new church in West Superior, Wis.




1892 Superior, Wis., City Directory

Carrie was younger than her sister, and a very good looking girl, which is said to have had some bearing upon the family affairs of the Hermans. In January 1892, Mrs. Hermans was suddenly taken violently insane from no explicit cause. During her “spells” Mrs. Hermans was one of the most violent cases ever seen, and made a number of exhibitions of herself. She was examined by several doctors, and preparations were made to send her to the Oshkosh insane asylum.

Some reports say Bertha Hermans died a couple of days before she left for the asylum, and others say it was after she went to the asylum. In either case, traces of ammonia were found around her mouth, which Hermans explained by saying that the drug had been given to quiet her nerves. The case was considered strange at the time, and illusions were made to its odd features in the local papers, but the woman was buried without an inquiry. This is one of the matters to which the police are now directing their attention.

Hermans’ sister-in-law Carrie continued to live in West Superior and do domestic work for him after the death of her sister. It is said Hermans was very attentive to her, and openly took her around town nights. Carrie Wangen stayed in West Superior with no seeming objective, often saying she was going to leave, but never going. About this time Hermans went to a camp meeting, and when he returned, it was announced that he had married wife No. 3, Miss Martha Lommen on Jan. 17, 1893, in Minneapolis. Lommen was born in Iowa; her brother Edwin was a state senator from Polk County, Minn.


Martha Lommen Hermans5

It appears that Carrie was not to be so easily disposed of, and stayed around Rev. Hermans. (Relatives said Carrie found Hermans repugnant, so it’s possible she stayed around to find evidence that Hermans was at fault for her sister’s death.) Finally, it was announced that she was going to leave, and so far as anyone knows, she did leave, but never got back to her home, and another case of a mysterious disappearance was chronicled. No trace of her was ever discovered.

In the fall of 1893, Rev. Hermans and his wife Martha were transferred to Salt Lake City. In late March of 1895, Martha gave birth to a healthy baby girl, who died suddenly on April 15, 1895. Martha followed her daughter in death three days later for no obvious reason. It is now thought that Hermans may have had a hand in in their deaths.


Death announcement for Hermans’ wife and infant daughter4


Authorities in Salt Lake City sent photos of Rev. Hermans to every large city in the U.S. and Canada. He was a large man with sandy hair, a red walrus mustache and gold-rimmed glasses, someone who would certainly stand out; and yet, he was never found. Many accounts of his being seen in a variety of towns and cities were reported to the Salt Lake City police, but he was never captured nor positively identified. Numerous newspaper stories about the “Bluebeard Pastor” would be written and printed over the years, hoping to revitalize the search for the murderer, but none came to fruition. The mystery of what happened to Rev. Hermans continues to this day. One can only hope that he got what he deserved.


The Salt Lake Herald; “Sanctuary of God Defiled With Blood. One of the Crimes of the Century Has Evidently Been Committed in Peaceful Salt Lake City. Victim Was a Woman. Tragedy Enacted at the Scandinavian Methodist Church. Body Was Cremated. Efforts of the Murderer to Destroy the Evidences.”; Salt Lake City, UT; May 23, 1896; pp. 1 & 2.


The Salt Lake Herald; “Startling Developments! Officials Will Search For Miss Samuelson’s Body Today. The Knife Identified. Belonged to Rev. Francis Hermans, Who is Accused of Murder. Visitors at the Church. Thousands Viewed the House of Worship Yesterday.”; Salt Lake City, UT; May 25, 1896; pp. 1 & 2.

The Sun; “Utah’s Murder Mystery. Our Police Asked To Look Out For The Fugitive Parson. Evidence That The Rev. Mr. Hermans Killed Miss Clawson and then Cremated Her Body—His Sweetheart Also Missing—Known That He Pawned Her Watch.”; New York City, NY; May 25, 1896; p. 1.

The Salt Lake Herald; “A Price on Hermans’ Head. The State offers a Reward for His Capture. Miss Samuelsen’s Fate. It Now Appears That the Pastor Sold Her Trunk Also. The Telegram From Annie. It Is Believed That Hermans Wrote It.”; Salt Lake City, UT; May 27, 1896; pp. 1 & 2.  

The Salt Lake Herald; “Hermans Was A Sport. Kept Four Horses at the Eclipse Livery Stables. His midnight Drives. Took at Least Six Young Women Out on Different Occasions. Officers Hard at Work. Particulars Concerning Miss Samuelson’s Clothing Found at Ephraim.”; Salt Lake City, UT; May 28, 1896; p. 1 & 6.

St. Paul Globe; “Hermans’ Victims. Suspicion That His Second Wife’s Sister Was One.”
May 28, 1896; p. 2.

Chicago Tribune; “ Rev. Francis Hermans Wanted for Murder”; Chigago, Ill.; Nov. 18, 1900; p. 4.

Ogden Standard Examiner; “Pastor, Suspected of Killing 5, Escapes Capture in Bizarre Case”; Ogden, UT; Dec. 26, 1954.



1The Salt Lake Herald., May 24, 1896; p. 1.       

2Salt Lake Herald; Salt Lake City, Utah; May 23, 1896; p. 1.

3The Salt Lake Herald; May 27, 1896; p. 1.

4The Salt Lake Herald., April 19, 1895; p. 6.


               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MHS records.  Both short searches and family history reports.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com ®  click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com 

 


Friday, May 22, 2015

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 22

May 22, 1904 - Peter O. Elliott, the Minneapolis lunatic, who, armed with a revolver, attempted to force his way into the White House to see President Theodore Roosevelt last October, committed suicide on this date.  His lifeless body was found dangling from a short rope from the Short Line Bridge by a fisherman. Deputy Coroner W. B. Murphy cut the body down and brought it to the county morgue. 


   

Short Line Railroad Bridge1


Elliott, who had been a fugitive from the state insane hospital in St. Peter for the last six months, returned to Minneapolis on Thursday evening, May 19, and was immediately picked up by the police. Investigation showed that he had been formally discharged from the asylum after he had been gone six months, and he was released.


  Peter O. Elliott2


That Elliott had deliberately planned self-destruction is shown by the elaborate preparations he had made. His pockets bulged with letters and newspaper clippings in which he tried to explain the motive of his course in life as well as those prompting him to kill himself.

The Minneapolis Journal; “Elliott’s Body Found Hanging. Fanatic Who Gained National Notoriety Commits Suicide. Papers on His Person Indicate that He Was the Victim of an Insane Self-appreciation—His Rebuff at the White House Had Preyed Upon His Mind.”; May 23, 1904; p. 7.


1Photo taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain May 22, 2015, as long as acknowledgement included.
2Minneapolis Journal; Oct. 6, 1903; p. 1.



Minnesotan tries to force his way into White House to see Roosevelt; see Oct. 5, 2014, blog

Elliott declared insane; see Oct. 6, 2014 blog

Elliott escapes St. Peter asylum; see Nov. 24, 2014 blog



               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MHS records.  Both short searches and family history reports.

Website: 
TheMemoryQuilt.com ®  click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com  




Thursday, May 21, 2015

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 21

May 21, 1907 – Joe and Pearl Redenbaugh arrived in St. Paul this morning with Detectives P. J. Lavalle, St. Paul, and Frank Brunskill and Bert Weare, Minneapolis. The detectives say there is a deep attachment between the couple.



Joe and Pearl Redenbaugh1



“She is his weakness,” they say, “and she has been duped by him.”

When asked if she would get a divorce, Pearl Redenbaugh said she loved her husband and always will, and has absolutely no plans to divorce him.

Detective Lavalle, however had his own opinion of the admitted murderer. “He’s the kind of fellow one would like to pummel and choke after one has seen a little of him.”  

Redenbaough had no sooner been placed in the jail beneath the same roof as his confessed accomplice in the Patrolman Connery and Mrs. Alice McQuillan murders, Frank McCool, arrested April 29 at North Platte, Neb., three days after the Dunn murder, than the latter was taken to district court.



Frank McCool2


McCool was arraigned shortly after 10 a.m. under an indictment charging first degree murder in connection with the slaying of Patrolman Connery on April 24. He pleaded not guilty, and trial was set for June 4.

Considering that Redenbaugh and McCool have already admitted their parts in both crimes, their trials in Minneapolis are not expected to consume much time.


Meanwhile in St. Paul, the suit McCool is said to have worn when he and Redenbaugh killed Connery has been discovered. Police now have the bloodstained and torn suit.

It was found in the Rossman clothing store where McCool originally purchased the suit and took it to be pressed and cleaned April 27, the day following the murder of Alice McQuillan Dunn, and three days after the Connery killing. 

The finding of the suit forges, the police say, an important link in the case against Redenbaugh and McCool, as the store’s proprietor recognized photos of McCool and Redenbaugh when they were shown to him as two men who had purchased suits at his store about 10 days before the Connery and Dunn murders. 

McCool returned to the store alone the morning of April 27, the day following the murder of Mrs. Dunn, with the suit he had purchased, asking that it be mended, cleaned and pressed. He said he wanted it in a hurry, as he was leaving town that afternoon. The coat was torn in a jagged manner in several places and the trousers bore blood stains, some of which an attempt had been made to wash out.

Redenbaugh said in his confession that Moore paid him and McCool $1,500 each the day after Mrs. Dunn’s murder. The time of the payment and the time McCool took the murder suit to be repaired and cleaned indicates the visit to the clothiers’ was probably two hours after the payment of the Dunn murder money.     


St. Paul Daily News; “Confessed Slayer Arrives For Trial. Joseph Redenbaugh in Mill City Cell—Faces Murder Charges. Wife Held in St. Paul. Frank McCool, Alleged Accomplice, Pleads Not Guilty. Murderer’s Wife Bares Life Story. Murder Suit is Found in St. Paul.”; May 21, 1917; pp. 1 & 2

1St. Paul Daily News, May 16, 1917; p. 1

2St. Paul Daily News; May 7, 1917; p. 1.


Disappearance of Minneapolis Patrolman George Connery; see April 24, 2015 blog

Car Connery disappeared in found in St. Paul; see April 25, 2015 blog

Murder of Alice McQuillan Dunn; see April 26, 2015 blog

More than 1,000 volunteers join Minneapolis police in the search for missing patrolman; see April 28, 2015 blog

Connery and Dunn murders linked; see May 4, 2015, blog

Anonymous caller tells police where body of Connery is located; see May 5, 2015 blog

Second man in “death car” arrested in Omaha; see May 7, 2015 blog


Patrolman George Connery laid to rest; see May 8, 2015 blog

Frank McCool attacks a jailer when caught trying to escape Omaha jail; see May 10,2015 blog


Eddie Hamilton (aka Joe Redenbaugh) arrested in San Francisco; see May 11, 2015 blog


Eddie Hamilton admits to being Joe Redenbaugh; see May 12, 2015 blog

Joe Redenbaugh confesses to murdering Alice McQuillan Dunn and Minneapolis Patrolman George Connery, and implicates Frank McCool in both crimes; see May15, 2015 blog



               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including: 
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MHS records.  Both short searches and family history reports.

Website:  
TheMemoryQuilt.com ®  click on Family History

Contact me at: 
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com