Sunday, May 27, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 27

May 27, 1916 – Wallace Hamilton, former football star at the University of Minnesota, today gave a pint and a half of his blood for the sake of a man he had never met. The effort to save the life of Henry Wirtz, an iron worker, ill at the Fairview Hospital, was believed to have been successful late today. Hamilton walked from the hospital after the operation, laughing and joking about his experience.


Wallace Hamilton
1


Up until a few weeks ago, Wirtz had been a healthy man. Then he was taken ill and his physicians found that he was suffering from pernicious anemia
(an inability to absorb the vitamin B-12 needed for your body to make enough healthy red blood cells) and declared that only an immediate transfusion of blood could save the patient’s life.



Henry Wirtz2

Hamilton read of the need to save the life of Wirtz and volunteered. The family of John Ludvig, a fellow worker with Wirtz at Stremel Bros. Roofing & Cornice Company, prevented his helping his friend, and Joe M. Kelley, another workman, could not be found, so Hamilton was summoned by telephone.



Headline Asking for Help3


After the notice was published in the newspaper, scores of people responded, both genders and a variety of ages. The patient expressed the desire that one of his fellow workman be selected. Three men were chosen and an agglutination test4 made to test their blood to ensure that the recipient’s and donor’s blood were compatible.

“This is Mr. Wirtz,” said the doctor by way of introduction.

A short incision in the left forearm of Hamilton, a small tube leading to a paraffin-lined glass receptacle, graduated to show the amount, and a pint and a half was soon obtained. Then the tube was attached to Wirtz in the same manner. Before all the blood had been injected, Wirtz’s pale flesh showed the glow of a healthy man. The wounds were dressed, the two men shook hands and Hamilton laughingly departed, apparently anxious to escape the expressions of gratitude that followed him.


1The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “ Former ‘U’ Football Star Gives of Blood to Save a Stranger. Wallace Hamilton Submits to Transfusion, Then Walks Smiling From Hospital. Takes Place of Man Whose Folks Objected. Athlete No Worse for Operation and Sick Man Is Much Improved.”; May 28, 1916; p. 11.

2The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “More Than Score Offer Their Blood in an Effort to Save Workman’s Life. Men and Women of All Stations Anxious to Assist Henry Wirtz. Fellow Craftsmen Will Be Chosen for Transfusion Operation.”; May 26, 1916; pp. 1 & 4.

3The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; May 25, 1916; p. 1.

4https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agglutination_(biology)
______________________________________________

Wirtz underwent a fourth blood transfusion on Dec. 11, 1916, after suffering a relapse earlier in the week. There seems to be nothing further about him in the local newspapers.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Fourth Transfusion Operation on Worker. I. I. Simon Gives of Blood in Attempt to Save Life of Henry Wirtz.”; Dec. 12, 1916; p. 14.

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If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


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Saturday, May 26, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 26


May 26, 1922 – A plea for Minneapolis business men to aid Dunwoody Institute in securing work for its students while they are in training and locating positions for them when they have completed their courses was made by Dr. C. A. Prosser, director, before the Minneapolis Rotary Club at its meeting in the institute this noon.

“I ask you to try out the two-boy plan of employment,” Dr. Prosser said. “We will send you two boys to do anything you want them to do from scrubbing to trained work. Employ one for one week and one for the next. By this alternate employment each boy will be able to earn sufficient to remain in Dunwoody and keep up his studies as well.”

Dr. Prosser declared that the purpose of the institution was “to take a man at any time and train him for anything.” He explained that the institution conducted day and night classes without interruption throughout the year and during the past 10 months its enrollment had been 4,322 men ranging in age from 16 years to 60 years.






Photos taken by Pamela J. Erickson. Released into the public domain May 26, 2018,
as long as acknowledgement included.



“It is an institution for poor, plucky, worthy, ambitious boys and men,” Dr. Prosser said. “The men who come here are the cream of the working class and are paying the price to make something of themselves. I know of only one boy in the institution, and he was the son of a baker, who had his way entirely paid.

The day work of the school was described by R. T. Craig, assistant director, and the evening and extension work by Reed Bass, assistant director.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “Jobs Are Sought for Dunwoody Students. Minneapolis Business Men Are Urged By Dr. C. A. Prosser to Provide Work.”; May 27, 1922; p. 4.
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If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Friday, May 25, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 25

May 25, 1908 – An exciting race with death from the little hamlet of Wawota, Saskatchewan, which lies far away from the railroad in Western Canada, to Minneapolis to reach the Pasteur Institute at the State University was culminated this morning, when little Winifred Randall, 10 years old, was examined by Dr. Orianna McDaniel and pronounced within reach of medical aid for hydrophobia (rabies), with which she is suffering as the result of a dog bite.

Located in the handsome new institute of public health and pathology building at the State University, the Pasteur Institute opened last August. Prior to that, the closest institute was located in Chicago.

Both Dr. Westbrook and Dr. McDaniel of the Minneapolis Pasteur Institute, express great hopes for the little English girl’s complete recovery after she has taken the three weeks’ treatment prescribed by the institute.

Horace Randall, the father, when he heard the doctors’ reassuring news after the examination, was overcome with joy. For the last few days and nights, he and the little one have been traveling towards his daughter’s one salvation as fast as horses, boats and steam could carry them. Night and day he has been fearing that he would arrive too late.

The little girl, in her home on the prairies, was bitten by a dog last week and the with the first appearance of the symptoms, was driven by team to the railroad some miles distant, where she bade goodbye to her mother, and with her father, took the train to Winnipeg. At the latter city nothing could be done for the child as there is no Pasteur Institute there, and the father was advised to hurry the child to Minneapolis. Jumping from the train this morning at the Union Depot, the desperate father hurried into a hack and drove to the Institute at the University.



Wawota, Saskatchewan to Winnipeg, Manitoba, then on to Minneapolis1

Winnipeg people have taken widespread interest in the case and are taking up a public subscription to defray the expenses of the treatment. As the case is from out of the state, the fee will be $100. Randall has secured lodging quarters for himself and his daughter on the East Side, near the Institute where the little girl will present herself every morning for treatment.

Winifred will be at the Institute to take her first treatment tomorrow morning, and her father will accompany her.

The Minneapolis Tribune; “Child, Mad Dog Victim, Hurried to Minneapolis. 10-year-old Canadian Girl in Long Race to Save Her Life.”: May 26, 1908; p. 1.

The Northfield News; “Ready to Cure Rabies. State Board of Health Has Equipped Laboratory Authorized by State.”; Aug. 17, 1907; p. 3.

The Minneapolis Tribune; “Hydrophobia Is on the Increase. Disease Grows in State, but Not in the City of Minneapolis. Superintendent of Pasteur Institute Describes Treatment. Fantastic Ideas Held as to Propagation of Rabies Dispelled.”; July 5, 1908; p. 15.

1http://www.canadaab.com/distance/28121347-28007019
_________________________

Winifred Randall survived her ordeal with rabies. From a scientific standpoint, her recovery was very important for the Pasteur methods.

The Minneapolis Tribune; “Treatment Given Girl Will Prevent Rabies”; May 29, 1908; p. 9.

_________________________



Louis Pasteur2

During the mid-to late 19th Century, Louis Pasteur demonstrated that microorganisms cause disease and discovered how to make vaccines from weakened microbes. He developed the earliest vaccines against fowl cholera, anthrax and rabies.3

2
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Pasteur#/media/File:Louis_Pasteur,_foto_av_F%C3%A9lix_Nadar_Crisco_edit.jpg

3https://www.sciencehistory.org/historical-profile/louis-pasteur

Thursday, May 24, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 24

May 24, 2010 – A Minnesota man was named the tallest man in the United States on this date by Guinness World Records. Igor Vovkovinsky of Rochester, Minn., measured 7 feet 8.33 inches tall during a session of NBC’s “The Dr. Oz Show.”  The 27-year-old Vovkovinsky “moved to Minnesota with his mother from the Ukraine when he was 7 years old” so he could receive “treatment at the Mayo Clinic for a pituitary disease that spurred his rapid growth.” According to Guinness, “the world’s tallest man is Turkey’s Sultan Kosen, who stands at 8 feet 1 inch tall.”

http://blogs.theworldlink.com/weird_news/tag/minnesota/



http://www.thetallestman.com/images/igorvovkovinskiy/igorvovkovinskiy%20(48).jpg
               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including: census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.





Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow. 


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Wednesday, May 23, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 23

May 23, 2004 - A circus performer fell 30 feet to her death “onto a concrete floor during a Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus show” in St. Paul. According to a spokesman, it was the first fatal accident in a Ringling Bros. circus in at least a decade.”

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2004-05-23-circus-death_x.htm




http://gomdl.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Ringling-Bros-Barnum-Bailey-400x160.jpg

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

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Tuesday, May 22, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 22


May 22, 1934 – C. Arthur Lyon died on this date after being “clubbed by strikers” during the Minneapolis Teamsters Strike during the summer of 1934. Lyon, a factory executive and “leader in the Citizens Alliance, a group of employers that squashed unions in Minneapolis for 30 years,” had volunteered to help control the strike, signing on as a special deputy. His name was added to the National Law Enforcement Memorial in Washington, D.C. for fallen officers. While not a police officer, he is considered to have died in the line of duty.

StarTribune; “Volunteer killed by strikers in 1934 honored”; Minneapolis, Minn.; May 14, 2012; pp. 9A and 10A.



1934 Minneapolis Teamster's Strike

http://placeholdermedia.com/projects/59revolutions/imageinfo.php

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                   


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Monday, May 21, 2018

On This Date in Minnesota History: May 21

May 21, 1917 – Willis Haviland of St. Paul, an aviator in the La Fayette Escadrille, has been awarded the war cross with a palm in recognition of his services in bringing down enemy machines. News of the honor given the 26-year-old young man was contained in dispatches from Paris today.

Haviland went to Europe as an ambulance driver 18 months ago. When he finished his six months’ service in the ambulance corps, he went into the French flying corps. His mother, Mrs. Grace N. Haviland, recently went to Paris to be near her son.

On April 30, Haviland engaged in battle with German air machines at a height of 4,000 feet. After a spirited fight one German plane was riddled with bullets and collapsed.

The Minneapolis Morning Tribune; “St. Paul Boy Wins French War Cross for nerve in Air. Brings German Plane Down After Battle at Height of 4,000 Feet.”; May 22, 1917; p. 4.




French War Cross with Palm
http://nyrfan25.tripod.com/medals.html

               __________________________________________________________

If you are interested in finding out more about your family history in Minnesota, I specialize in researching  genealogical and historical records in Minn. and western Wis., including:
census records,  birth records,  death certificates, obits, grave site photos, ship passenger lists, marriage records and declarations of intent/naturalization records.  I will visit locations to research local history and county records, as well as take photos. Quick turnaround on MNHS records. Both short searches and family history reports available.

                                                         


Discover your roots, and watch the branches of your family tree begin to grow.


Website:  TheMemoryQuilt.com > click on Family History

Contact me at:
pjefamilyresearch@gmail.com